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The Price of Spring by Daniel Abraham
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The Price of Spring

by Daniel Abraham

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2881960,719 (4.1)17
Fifteen years have passed since the devastating war between the Galt Empire and the cities of the Khaiem, in which the Khaiem's poets and their magical power known as "andat" were destroyed, leaving the women of the Khaiem and the men of Galt infertile. The emperor of the Khaiem is trying to form a marriage alliance between his son and the daughter of a Galtic lord, hoping the Khaiem men and Galtic women will produce a new generation to help create a peaceful future.But Maati, a poet who has been in hiding for years and is driven by guilt over his part in the disastrous end of the war, defies tradition and begins training female poets. With Eiah, the emperor's daughter, helping him, he intends to create andat and to restore the world to how it was before the war. As the prospect of peace dims under the lash of Vanjit's new andat, Maati and Eiah try to end her reign of terror. But time is running out for both the Galts and the Khaiem.… (more)

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Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
The Price of Spring is the fourth and final book of Daniel Abraham's Long Price Quartet. The series title is quite apt. There is both a high price to pay and yet even more time has passed between books. Fifteen years to be precise. Otah Machi now rules the Khaiem as Emperor and he has decided to ally with his country's rival nation and mortal enemy in order to save both countries. To say that Otah's decision for his country is unpopular is putting it mildly.

I found this book to be a fitting end to the series. The theme of the cycle of life, the passing of the torch from one generation to the next, and how the passage of time changes people (or not in some cases) is strongly felt. It's an impressive feat to have pulled off and it makes for a series that is likely more appreciated by older audience than perhaps a younger one.

I'm happy to say I finally found a characters I could get behind in Eieh and, eventually, Danat and Ana. Poor, poor Maati. He has to be one of the most tragic and misguided characters I've read about in a long time. I both feel bad for him and disgusted by him. Vanjit was another interesting and different villain. I was mostly able to predict where she was headed given her situation, though I was still surprised just how far she went in the end.

As much as I enjoyed the book there were several things that also bothered me. Otah's grand plan to unite with the Galt's for example. There are many more nations based on the map of the world. Why did he have to pick the people that ruined and almost conquered his country? Why not one of the otheres, one that might have been easier for the people of the Khaiem to accept? Also, the Khaiem are such oddballs. It's like the worst case of nationalized xenophobia ever! They'd rather die than see their children marry and procreate with anyone outside of their society. That whole solution never quite made sense to me other than Otah assuaging his guilt by forcing his country into a situation they hated. I also found the final resolution to be anticlimactic. I'm glad it worked out the way it did - it was just over too fast, basically wrapping up in a page and a half.

While I don't think I'll ever reread this series, I'm glad to have read it. I truly enjoy Abraham's writing and had an interesting time visiting the world of the andat. I think I'll be picking up the author's Expanse series sometime in the future. ( )
  Narilka | Sep 21, 2019 |
The final book of the Long Price Quartet, or why not to put the power of gods at the disposal of mortals. Some characters make decisions that are less than disastrous, but those are often the least believable of the choices made. By the time I got around to reading this I'd lost the immediacy of my connection to the storytelling in the first three books, so perhaps that's why I kept jumping out of the context - or maybe the story was more annoying and less rewarding than the earlier volumes. ( )
  quondame | Aug 3, 2019 |
EDITORIAL REVIEW:

Fifteen years have passed since the devastating war between the Galt Empire and the cities of the Khaiem in which the Khaiem’s poets and their magical power known as “andat” were destroyed, leaving the women of the Khaiem and the men of Galt infertile.



The emperor of the Khaiem tries to form a marriage alliance between his son and the daughter of a Galtic lord, hoping the Khaiem men and Galtic women will produce a new generation to help create a peaceful future.



But Maati, a poet who has been in hiding for years, driven by guilt over his part in the disastrous end of the war, defies tradition and begins training female poets. With Eiah, the emperor’s daughter, helping him, he intends to create andat, to restore the world as it was before the war.



Vanjit, a woman haunted by her family’s death in the war, creates a new andat. But hope turns to ashes as her creation unleashes a power that cripples all she touches.



As the prospect of peace dims under the lash of Vanjit’s creation, Maati and Eiah try to end her reign of terror. But time is running out for both the Galts and the Khaiem.
  buffygurl | Mar 8, 2019 |
The wonderful, enormously satisfying conclusion to the Long Price Quartet series: if Daniel Abraham captured my imagination with his s/f work (as half of the J.A. Corey duo who wrote the Expanse trilogy), he has totally won me over with this outstanding fantasy series and his rich writing.

Full review here: http://spaceandsorcery.blogspot.it/2014/03/the-price-of-spring-daniel-abraham.ht... ( )
  SpaceandSorcery | Dec 25, 2018 |
An excellent conclusion to a truly impressive series.
You could probably read this on its own, but the experience would be much richer for having read the ones that come before – I recommend reading the whole series (4 books, each set 15 years apart.)
[A bitchy aside here – not enough of these were printed. I ended up having to get this one through interlibrary loan… why do publishers always do this!? (I know why, that is a rhetorical question. It’s just annoying.)]
As the book opens, the cities of the Khaiem and their rivals/enemies of the Kingdom of Galt have been thrown into a disastrous situation due to the actions of the andat (a kind of magical golem) at the conclusion of the previous book (An Autumn War). Fifteen years have passed, but the kingdoms, instead of working together (a solution which would ensure survival), have both weltered in bitterness and failure.

Now, both the Khai and his old friend/enemy/rival Maati each have a plan to save the lands of the Khaiem. However, the plans are completely mutually incompatible. Each works hard and desperately to convince others to make the compromises and sacrifices necessary for a scheme to work. Each is convinced of the rightness of his actions. But the reader sees that disaster seems inevitable.

At first, I had doubts about the book, because one of the main characters is operating on the premise that conclusions on a topic, if researched and created by women rather than men, will be utterly different, because men and women think so differently. I don’t agree. But Abraham deals with this deftly, and although gender politics are a large part of the book, his characters are all fully-realized individuals. Abraham is truly excellent at creating complex characters and multivalent relationships between them – one of my favorite things about this series is that it presents characters from different angles – it shows believably how people change, how one person can be seen differently by different people, at different times. The reader can’t trust that someone who seems to be a villain at one time will remain a villain.

In a vivid and unique setting, Abraham concludes a story which is difficult at times, thoughtful, and deeply satisfying.
( )
  AltheaAnn | Feb 9, 2016 |
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To Scarlet Abraham.
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Eiah Machi, physician and daughter of the Emperor, pressed her fingers gently on the woman's belly.
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Fifteen years have passed since the devastating war between the Galt Empire and the cities of the Khaiem in which the Khaiem's poets and their magical power known as "andat" were destroyed, leaving the women of the Khaiem and the men of Galt infertile.

The emperor of the Khaiem tries to form a marriage alliance between his son and the daughter of a Galtic lord, hoping the Khaiem men and Galtic women will produce a new generation to help create a peaceful future.

But Maati, a poet who has been in hiding for years, driven by guilt over his part in the disastrous end of the war, defies tradition and begins training female poets. With Eiah, the emperor's daughter, helping him, he intends to create andat, to restore the world as it was before the war.

Vanjit, a woman haunted by her family's death in the war, creates a new andat. But hope turns to ashes as her creation unleashes a power that cripples all she touches.

As the prospect of peace dims under the lash of Vanjit's creation, Maati and Eiah try to end her reign of terror. But time is running out for both the Galts and the Khaiem.
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