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Dutchman and The Slave: Two Plays by LeRoi…
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Dutchman and The Slave: Two Plays (edition 1971)

by LeRoi Jones (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
536835,157 (3.66)8
Centered squarely on the Negro-white conflict, both Dutchman and The Slave are literally shocking plays--in ideas, in language, in honest anger. They illuminate as with a flash of lightning a deadly serious problem--and they bring an eloquent and exceptionally powerful voice to the American theatre. Dutchman opened in New York City on March 24, 1964, to perhaps the most excited acclaim ever accorded an off-Broadway production and shortly thereafter received the Village Voice's Obie Award. The Slave, which was produced off-Broadway the following fall, continues to be the subject of heated critical controversy.… (more)
Member:ScaglioneS
Title:Dutchman and The Slave: Two Plays
Authors:LeRoi Jones (Author)
Info:Harper Perennial (1971), Edition: Later Printing, 87 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:Literature

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Dutchman and The Slave: Two Plays by Amiri Baraka

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» See also 8 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
My first time reading Baraka. Where the Dutchman has a mounting tension the Slave is an all out bombardment. I'm still sorting through so much of what he engaged in both. I was particularly impressed with the way he engaged the somatic experience, the body.
  b.masonjudy | Jun 12, 2020 |
aka LeRoi Jones
  Savornin | Dec 20, 2018 |
I can see why these plays were considered so shocking when they debuted in 1963 and 1964. They both suggest that violence is the logical end to the impasses of black-white race relations, and you can see Jones/Baraka's barely repressed fury at work in both of them. But they don't strike me as great drama in the sense that the characters themselves are not all that believable, and the staging is pretty minimal, even boring. The plays mainly consist of characters acting as voices for different philosophical systems or ideas, and the action is all talking, punctuated by a single act of violence in each play. ( )
1 vote jalbacutler | Jan 10, 2017 |
For a white woman to review these plays would seem an adventure in irony, considering the content of the plays. I will leave it at that. ( )
  Devil_llama | Jun 4, 2015 |
I really want to see this play now. The dialogue drills RIGHT into your skull. Dutchman is like a hammer to the brain. I can't describe it more. ( )
  cendri | May 30, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
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Centered squarely on the Negro-white conflict, both Dutchman and The Slave are literally shocking plays--in ideas, in language, in honest anger. They illuminate as with a flash of lightning a deadly serious problem--and they bring an eloquent and exceptionally powerful voice to the American theatre. Dutchman opened in New York City on March 24, 1964, to perhaps the most excited acclaim ever accorded an off-Broadway production and shortly thereafter received the Village Voice's Obie Award. The Slave, which was produced off-Broadway the following fall, continues to be the subject of heated critical controversy.

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