HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World (2008)

by Liaquat Ahamed

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,3033611,271 (4)53
With penetrating insights for today, this vital history of the world economic collapse of the late 1920s offers unforgettable portraits of four men--Montagu Norman, Amile Moreau, Hjalmar Schacht, and Benjamin Strong--whose personal and professional actions as heads of their respective central banks changed the course of the twentieth century.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 53 mentions

English (34)  Spanish (1)  German (1)  All languages (36)
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
Long and not very convincing

This is a good overview about the causes and consequences of the Great Depression.

But it has some problems.

First, it focuses on the life of 4 men that, back then, were the central bankers of the 4 most influential countries on Earth. But, despite the author's effort, these were not really very interesting people.

Second, the author's thesis is that these 4 bankers were responsible for the crash because they failed to respond adequately to the successive crisis. But the author himself exhaustively describes the economic difficulties the western war faced after the World and how the governments of the US, Britain, France and Germany were unable to work together to solve them. So, at the end, these 4 bankers weren't as central to the Crisis as the author suggest (which makes focusing on them even more irrelevant). ( )
  Pindarix | Jul 15, 2021 |
The Lords of Finance covers the economists and bankers of the four major nation in the early decades of the 1900's, and how their decisions may have contributed to the Great Depression in the U.S. and worldwide. It was interesting to see how much was not understood, and how the post WWI policies and war reparations impacted Germany leading up to WWII. ( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
nonfiction (economics/history WWI and after)
This is probably really interesting if you are into economics; I usually enjoy ('enjoy' is maybe too strong a word) thoroughly researched books on topics I know too little about, but I found this mundane--lots of little details about people whose names I'll never remember. I did pick up on some of the big ideas, but at page 198 I decided to call it quits. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |

For a dry subject the author makes a real page turner out of it. Great read very à propos. We all know how it finishes but he keeps us interested in getting there. ( )
  abrillon63 | Feb 8, 2021 |
Very interesting and relevant to today. Seeing the separate events of the 1921-1923 hyperinflation, 1929 Stockmarket crash on Wall Street, and 1931 bankruptcy of Germany. Seeing how they were linked by a gradual tightening of liquidity. How this could lead to 30% drops in GDP and the collapse of democracy. Also how Roosevelt, economically uneducated, leaving the gold standard against all advice. ( )
  wildfry | Feb 20, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
A grand, sweeping narrative of immense scope and power, the book describes a world that long ago receded from memory: the West after World War I, a time of economic fragility, of bubbles followed by busts and of a cascading series of events that led to the Great Depression.

added by mikeg2 | editNew York Times, Joe Nocera (Feb 13, 2009)
 
With penetrating insights for today, this vital history of the world economic collapse of the late 1920s offers unforgettable portraits of four men--Montagu Norman, Amile Moreau, Hjalmar Schacht, and Benjamin Strong--whose personal and professional actions as heads of their respective central banks changed the course of the twentieth century.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 8
2.5
3 37
3.5 7
4 74
4.5 14
5 53

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,501,137 books! | Top bar: Always visible