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The Sun, Solar Analogs and the Climate : Saas-Fee Advanced Course 34 (2005)

by Joanna Dorothy Haigh, Mark S. Giampapa, Michael Lockwood

Other authors: Manuel Güdel (Editor), Isabelle Rüedi (Editor), Werner Schmutz (Editor), Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy (Host institution)

Series: Saas-Fee Advanced Courses (34)

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The 34th Saas-Fee advanced course of the Swiss Society of Astronomy and Astrophysics (SSAA) took place from March 15 to 20, 2004, in Davos, on the subject of The Sun, Solar Analogs and the Climate. PresentlytheSwissmountainresortofDavosisprobablymostwellknown for hosting an event on globalization. However, it is because Davos also happens to be the seat of the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos and World Radiation Center, that this course on a "global" subject was hosted here. Exceptionally, the topic of this course was not purely astrophysical, but themembersoftheSSAAdecidedtosupportitallthesameduetothetimely topic of global warming and its possible link to solar variations. In these times of concern about global warming, it is important to und- stand solar variability and its interaction with the atmosphere. Only in this way can we distinguish between the solar and anthropogenic contributions to the rising temperatures. Therefore, this course addressed the observed va- ability of the Sun and the present understanding of the variability's origin and its impact on the Earth's climate. Comparing the solar variability with that of solar analog stars leads to a better understanding of the solar activity cycle and magnetic activity in general, and helps us to estimate how large the solar variations could be on longer time scales. Inspiteofthefantasticweatherandsnowconditionswhichreignedduring this week, the participants assiduously took part in the lectures. This is proof ofthehighqualityofthelecturesthatthethreespeakers,JoannaHaigh,Mike Lockwood and David Soderblom, delivered. We deeply thank them for their contributions and e?orts and hope that the readers will enjoy the book as much as we enjoyed their lectures.… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Joanna Dorothy Haighprimary authorall editionscalculated
Giampapa, Mark S.main authorall editionsconfirmed
Lockwood, Michaelmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Güdel, ManuelEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rüedi, IsabelleEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Schmutz, WernerEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Swiss Society for Astrophysics and AstronomyHost institutionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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At periods of higher solar activity the Earth is subject to enhanced solar irradiance, a greater incidence of solar energetic particles and fewer galactic cosmic rays.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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The 34th Saas-Fee advanced course of the Swiss Society of Astronomy and Astrophysics (SSAA) took place from March 15 to 20, 2004, in Davos, on the subject of The Sun, Solar Analogs and the Climate. PresentlytheSwissmountainresortofDavosisprobablymostwellknown for hosting an event on globalization. However, it is because Davos also happens to be the seat of the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos and World Radiation Center, that this course on a "global" subject was hosted here. Exceptionally, the topic of this course was not purely astrophysical, but themembersoftheSSAAdecidedtosupportitallthesameduetothetimely topic of global warming and its possible link to solar variations. In these times of concern about global warming, it is important to und- stand solar variability and its interaction with the atmosphere. Only in this way can we distinguish between the solar and anthropogenic contributions to the rising temperatures. Therefore, this course addressed the observed va- ability of the Sun and the present understanding of the variability's origin and its impact on the Earth's climate. Comparing the solar variability with that of solar analog stars leads to a better understanding of the solar activity cycle and magnetic activity in general, and helps us to estimate how large the solar variations could be on longer time scales. Inspiteofthefantasticweatherandsnowconditionswhichreignedduring this week, the participants assiduously took part in the lectures. This is proof ofthehighqualityofthelecturesthatthethreespeakers,JoannaHaigh,Mike Lockwood and David Soderblom, delivered. We deeply thank them for their contributions and e?orts and hope that the readers will enjoy the book as much as we enjoyed their lectures.

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