HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Linked: How Everything Is Connected to Everything Else and What It Means

by Albert-László Barabási

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,787257,663 (3.86)17
A cocktail party. A terrorist cell. Ancient bacteria. An international conglomerate. All are networks, and all are a part of a surprising scientific revolution. In Linked , Albert-László Barabási, the nation's foremost expert in the new science of networks, takes us on an intellectual adventure to prove that social networks, corporations, and living organisms are more similar than previously thought. Barabási shows that grasping a full understanding of network science will someday allow us to design blue-chip businesses, stop the outbreak of deadly diseases, and influence the exchange of ideas and information. Just as James Gleick and the Erdos-Rényi model brought the discovery of chaos theory to the general public, Linked tells the story of the true science of the future and of experiments in statistical mechanics on the internet, all vital parts of what would eventually be called the Barabási-Albert model.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

English (22)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (25)
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
Nice introductory book on Network Science.

As a student of mathematical modeling, I found this book thought-provoking and interesting. Not a stranger to networks, I would say this book still managed to have some effect on me. It would be enough for me to credit this book with re-sparking my interest in the topics of network analysis and mathematical models.

A bit on the long-winded side at times, however. But this might be because it is not my first time with networks.

3.5-4/5 ( )
  nonames | Jan 14, 2022 |
The subtitle is a pretty good summary of the premise of this book. It explores the theoretical underpinnings of things being linked (referencing, for example, the Königsberg Bridge problem) and then explores how things are linked in nature as opposed to in social structures; the major distinction is that in nature, the number of “links” held by a given thing tends to be bell-curve distributed, whereas in socially-designed phenomena, it’s more of a y = 1/x sort of “the limit does not exist” on the tail end, allowing for “hubs.” This applies not only to social structure, but genetics, airline routes, the internet, and the Kevin Bacon game.

The finding is that if you have a dense network, picking a network node at random and eliminating it will not bring down the network… even if you do so for something like 80% of the network. But removing just 15-20% of the network hubs will cause the whole thing to come crashing down. ( )
  jarlalex | Nov 25, 2020 |
I read this book several years ago, when I was closing up my University studies. It opened my mind to new research opportunities that I have then undertaken for my ph.d.
The book gives a very nice introduction to the world of complex network, covering the random models and moving on to what the authors have discovered and named scale-free organization.
The mathematics are far from being heavy and down-to-the-ground examples are always reported to help the reader connecting to her daily life.
A very nice book! ( )
  ferrarini_luca | Dec 6, 2016 |
4 ( )
  ronchan | Nov 14, 2016 |
This is one of the most pleasant scientific reads in form of a book I have the pleasure to read had. The introduction to networks is very clever, not starting directly with science but rather introudcing all the basic and necessary conceptd, scientists and problems present in network theory. Hving presentef this the authors describes network research from a chronological poont of view, where it is very easy to understand all the new discovered concepts and the necessity of them. I have rarely had access to such pleasant literature. The book finishes describing thet last advances in network theory and paves the ground for the next conceptual step, which is networks dynamics.

My only concern is whether his papers are so well written and whether other books like this can be easily found in research areas that interest me like quantum interactions, doking, and so on.

It would have been really difficult to read from scratch a paper from this Albertq, without all this interesting introductions.

Now i am going to check the current status of his research and start to think how my research could benefit from his insights. ( )
  horacioemilio | Jan 17, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Szüleimnek
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
A cocktail party. A terrorist cell. Ancient bacteria. An international conglomerate. All are networks, and all are a part of a surprising scientific revolution. In Linked , Albert-László Barabási, the nation's foremost expert in the new science of networks, takes us on an intellectual adventure to prove that social networks, corporations, and living organisms are more similar than previously thought. Barabási shows that grasping a full understanding of network science will someday allow us to design blue-chip businesses, stop the outbreak of deadly diseases, and influence the exchange of ideas and information. Just as James Gleick and the Erdos-Rényi model brought the discovery of chaos theory to the general public, Linked tells the story of the true science of the future and of experiments in statistical mechanics on the internet, all vital parts of what would eventually be called the Barabási-Albert model.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.86)
0.5
1 4
1.5
2 17
2.5 7
3 56
3.5 20
4 123
4.5 7
5 76

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 169,964,480 books! | Top bar: Always visible