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The Sixteenth Round: From Number 1 Contender to Number 45472 (1974)

by Rubin Carter

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1342207,511 (4.61)3
The survivor of a difficult childhood and youth, Rubin Carter rose to become a top contender for the middleweight boxing crown. But his career crashed to a halt on May 26, 1967, when he and another man were found guilty of the murder of three white people in a New Jersey bar. While in prison, Carter chronicled the events that led him from the ring to three consecutive life sentences and 10 years in solitary confinement. His story was a cry for help to the public, an attempt to set the record straight and force a new trial. Bob Dylan wrote a classic anthem for Carter's struggle; and Joan Baez, Muhammad Ali, Roberta Flack, and thousands more took up the cause as well. Originally published in 1974, this account is an eye-opening examination of growing up black in America, problems in the United States prison system, and Carter's own battles.… (more)
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An inspiring story about one of this country's true unsung heroes. Written by Carter in prison this book eventually led to his freedom. ( )
  ForSusan | Aug 6, 2019 |
Great book. An amazingly tragic story that ended the career and almost the life of an extraordinary boxer. Movie was later made about Ruben Carters life (as well as a classic Bob Dylan song) starring Denzel Washington, which is very good as well. ( )
  tetchechury | Apr 3, 2007 |
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The survivor of a difficult childhood and youth, Rubin Carter rose to become a top contender for the middleweight boxing crown. But his career crashed to a halt on May 26, 1967, when he and another man were found guilty of the murder of three white people in a New Jersey bar. While in prison, Carter chronicled the events that led him from the ring to three consecutive life sentences and 10 years in solitary confinement. His story was a cry for help to the public, an attempt to set the record straight and force a new trial. Bob Dylan wrote a classic anthem for Carter's struggle; and Joan Baez, Muhammad Ali, Roberta Flack, and thousands more took up the cause as well. Originally published in 1974, this account is an eye-opening examination of growing up black in America, problems in the United States prison system, and Carter's own battles.

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