HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

George Sprott, 1894-1975 : a picture novella…
Loading...

George Sprott, 1894-1975 : a picture novella (edition 2009)

by Seth,

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1676141,044 (4.12)3
First serialized in The New York Times Magazine "Funny Pages" The celebrated cartoonist and New Yorker illustrator Seth weaves the fictional tale of George Sprott, the host of a long-running television program. The events forming the patchwork of George's life are pieced together from the tenuous memories of several informants, who often have contradictory impressions. His estranged daughter describes the man as an unforgivable lout, whereas his niece remembers him fondly. His former assistant recalls a trip to the Arctic during which George abandoned him for two months, while George himself remembers that trip as the time he began writing letters to a former love, from whom he never received replies. Invoking a sense of both memory and its loss, George Sprott is heavy with the charming, melancholic nostalgia that distinguishes Seth's work. Characters lamenting societal progression in general share the pages with images of antiquated objects--proof of events and individuals rarely documented and barely remembered. Likewise, George's own opinions are embedded with regret and a sense of the injustice of aging in this bleak reminder of the inevitable slipping away of lives, along with the fading culture of their days.… (more)
Member:juanjov
Title:George Sprott, 1894-1975 : a picture novella
Authors:Seth,
Info:Montreal : Drawn and Quarterly, 2009
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work Information

George Sprott: (1894-1975) by Seth

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Disappointing. A comics take on oral biographies that unlike those I've read fails to make the subject or the events in any way distinctive or even of much interest. For all the impact this has, George Sprott the arctic tourist and fading TV presenter might as well have been Peggy Lipton the bird-watching lab technician or the retired accountant Marc Schwob who always takes the cross-town bus to buy bananas.

Writing aside, part of the flatness is I think the result of Seth's drawing style; the. lines are rounded, the details only basic ones, the shading firmly delineated. That's fine but this style doesn't really allow for subtlety., the lack of which llimits the effectiveness of the biography. Nor iis it at all effective in portraying the hallucinatory memories of a dying man which the artist so valued that they are iin gatefold pages which weren't in the event worth unfolding.

Another drawback was the frequent insertion of the narrator into the account: his clanking apologies for not knowing all the details of Sprott's life were just annoying but his jejune speculations about the void before and after a person's life were cringe-making and the earnest observation that one's outer life mightn't be a true reflection of one's inner life was nearly as embarassing.

I was hoping for better than this. Good idea for a story and something striking could have been made of it by someone brighter who was a more flexible illustrator ( )
  bluepiano | Mar 12, 2021 |
As a person who really responds to narrative and structure, the way that Seth gives us the story of his protagonist, George Sprott, is the big seller here. Told through multiple perspectives, bouncing back and forth in time, and taking advantage of Seth's deceptively simple drawing style and the large format of the book, this narrative comes at its topic at an angle, but ends up capturing the man perfectly. Sprott was an at-loose-ends editor of a boys magazine turned gentleman arctic explorer, who rolled those experiences into a long career as a TV personality and lecturer. We learn about his childhood, the end of his life, those who loved him, those who hated him, and those who merely overlapped with him a bit. He wasn't a particularly good man, but by the end of this detailed graphic portrait, he becomes a very real one. ( )
  kristykay22 | May 28, 2017 |
An exercise in naturalism, this suffers from the usual complaint I have with the genre -- beautiful technique, all expended for normal people and everyday life. This is at it's best when it is silent and meditative; at it's worst when the "honest" narrative captions hang on to every panel. ( )
  TheEphemeraRemix | Jul 7, 2013 |
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  MightyLeaf | May 25, 2010 |
Unlike the comical (and wonderful) 'Winbledon Green', here author Seth sustains a deeply elegiac tone throughout. The large pages encourage (maybe even enforce) a slower-than-usual pace, which contributes. It never breaks through to overt sorrow, but that may be the point. ( )
  grunin | Jul 1, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
As with most of [Seth's] work, it’s a memorial to a lost age of localism and craft, even as it’s painfully alert to the dangerous allure of nostalgia.
 
Through a Citizen Kane-style mélange of interviews with those who knew him, the emerging portrait has the messiness of reality.
 
IN THE POPULAR imagination, comics are most often associated with fast-moving narratives, packed with action and incident, but in fact the medium is inherently static, each comic’s story being a series of still images, one after the other, with all motion and change being created in the mind of the reader. Few cartoonists have used this stasis more often or more effectively than Seth, whose protagonists often seem so averse to motion that they have become incapable of it
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

First serialized in The New York Times Magazine "Funny Pages" The celebrated cartoonist and New Yorker illustrator Seth weaves the fictional tale of George Sprott, the host of a long-running television program. The events forming the patchwork of George's life are pieced together from the tenuous memories of several informants, who often have contradictory impressions. His estranged daughter describes the man as an unforgivable lout, whereas his niece remembers him fondly. His former assistant recalls a trip to the Arctic during which George abandoned him for two months, while George himself remembers that trip as the time he began writing letters to a former love, from whom he never received replies. Invoking a sense of both memory and its loss, George Sprott is heavy with the charming, melancholic nostalgia that distinguishes Seth's work. Characters lamenting societal progression in general share the pages with images of antiquated objects--proof of events and individuals rarely documented and barely remembered. Likewise, George's own opinions are embedded with regret and a sense of the injustice of aging in this bleak reminder of the inevitable slipping away of lives, along with the fading culture of their days.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.12)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 8
3.5 1
4 14
4.5 1
5 17

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 177,142,782 books! | Top bar: Always visible