HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Tragedy and the Tragic: Greek Theatre and Beyond

by M. S. Silk (Editor)

Other authors: W. Geoffrey Arnott (Contributor), Richard Buxton (Contributor), Claude Calame (Contributor), P.E. Easterling (Contributor), Michael Ewans (Contributor)23 more, Helene P. Foley (Contributor), Rainer Friedrich (Contributor), A.F. Garvie (Contributor), Simon Goldhill (Contributor), John Gould (Contributor), Bernard Gredley (Contributor), Edith Hall (Contributor), Stephen Halliwell (Contributor), Ismene Lada (Contributor), Kevin Lee (Contributor), N.J. Lowe (Contributor), Fiona Macintosh (Contributor), Robin N. Mitchell-Boyask (Contributor), Emese Mogyorodi (Contributor), Thomas G. Rosenmeyer (Contributor), Richard Seaford (Contributor), Charles Segal (Contributor), Bernd Seidensticker (Contributor), George Steiner (Contributor), Oliver Taplin (Contributor), Michael Trapp (Contributor), A. Maria Van Erp Taalman Kip (Contributor), P.J. Wilson (Contributor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
13None1,205,408 (4)None
The Greeks invented tragedy; and from the age of the Greeks to the present day, tragedy has been seen to be a uniquely powerful and affecting form of art. But what makes it what it is? This challenging volume of twenty-nine new essays has an exceptional range - from Aeschylus to SeanO'Casey, from Aristotle to Rene Girard - but also a consistent focus on the ultimate question: how best to define or understand Greek tragedy in particular and tragedy in general. The contributors, who include many of the world's foremost names in the field of Greek drama, debate the question.They reassess particular Greek plays, from Oresteia to Antigone and Oedipus to Ion; they re-examine Greek tragedy in its cultural and political context; and they relate the tragedy of the Greeks to the serious drama and theoretical perspectives of the modern world, with Shakespeare at the forefrontof several essays.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Silk, M. S.Editorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Arnott, W. GeoffreyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Buxton, RichardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Calame, ClaudeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Easterling, P.E.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ewans, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Foley, Helene P.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Friedrich, RainerContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Garvie, A.F.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Goldhill, SimonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gould, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gredley, BernardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hall, EdithContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Halliwell, StephenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lada, IsmeneContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lee, KevinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lowe, N.J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Macintosh, FionaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mitchell-Boyask, Robin N.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mogyorodi, EmeseContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rosenmeyer, Thomas G.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Seaford, RichardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Segal, CharlesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Seidensticker, BerndContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Steiner, GeorgeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Taplin, OliverContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Trapp, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Van Erp Taalman Kip, A. MariaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wilson, P.J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

The Greeks invented tragedy; and from the age of the Greeks to the present day, tragedy has been seen to be a uniquely powerful and affecting form of art. But what makes it what it is? This challenging volume of twenty-nine new essays has an exceptional range - from Aeschylus to SeanO'Casey, from Aristotle to Rene Girard - but also a consistent focus on the ultimate question: how best to define or understand Greek tragedy in particular and tragedy in general. The contributors, who include many of the world's foremost names in the field of Greek drama, debate the question.They reassess particular Greek plays, from Oresteia to Antigone and Oedipus to Ion; they re-examine Greek tragedy in its cultural and political context; and they relate the tragedy of the Greeks to the serious drama and theoretical perspectives of the modern world, with Shakespeare at the forefrontof several essays.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 155,876,088 books! | Top bar: Always visible