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Euthyphro

by Plato

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277683,465 (4)10
ne day in 399BC in the Athenian Agora, shortly before his trial for impiety, Socrates meet Euthyphro, another citizen involved in a religious suit and their subsequent conversation, whether fact or fiction or a mixture of the two is vividly portrayed by Plato in his short dialogue Socrates being prosecuted for his supposed failure to acknowledge the gods is shown to have more concern for religious matters than his somewhat naive friend; at the same time, however, Socrates' probing about the logical inconsistencies in Euthyphro's views about piety and the gods reveal him as a radical critic of Athenian social and moral values. The simplicity of the style of Plato's Greek belies the dramatic richness of texture and subtle humour of the characterisation which makes this dialogue such a rewarding read for students with only a few years of Greek. A full vocabulary and grammatical notes on the text are matched by detailed discussion of social religious and philosophical content.… (more)
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Showing 4 of 4
No caminho para seu julgamento Sócrates encontra Eutifron, especialista em assuntos religiosos, a seguir também para a assembléia. Sócrates pensa que se Eutifron puder ensiná-lo a respeito da natureza do divino e da moralidade associada, poderá declarar-se seguidor do conhecido mestre e safar-se perante a acusação de corromper à juventude, ao interpretar o divino de modo supostamente perigoso e socialmente desagregador. Eutifron, entretanto, como era de se esperar, ver-se-á enredado na série de perguntas de um inquisitor com ideais de consistência conceitual muito maior do que o esperado. Ao dizer que está prestes a denunciar seu pai por ter ocasionado a morte de um servente, o religioso invoca os deuses para colocar o dever ético acima da relação de parentesco. Mas primeiro, a quais deuses ele quer assim atender? Não são eles diferentes? Possivelmente tem definições de justiça variadas e códigos de conduta que diferem, especialmente dado suas histórias de intrigas. Entretanto, (e mesmo se houvesse um favoritismo, ou redução à solução do fim do conflito, no monoteismo), a reverência aos deuses está ligada à justiça por ser ao gosto deles? Mas isso nos deixaria refém de alguma arbitrariedade divina, mal definida. Ou então definimos a justiça como algo que os deuses reconhecem e então recomendam, justiça, portanto, independente dos mesmos, e que seria necessário, nós também definir e conhecer para satisfazer as condições envolvidas de reverência. De modo que, sabiamente, Eutifron foge de sua ignorância, para não amargar má consciência caso seu pai seja de fato condenado, deixando Sócrates à merce dos lobos. ( )
  henrique_iwao | Aug 30, 2022 |
Read this in a pdf copy of John M. Cooper's "Plato: Complete Works", pages 1 - 16.

My first socratic dialogue from Plato. An interesting exploration of piety and morality, much more valuable as a display of an exercise of critical thought than anything else, as it doesn't provide answers (nor should there be answers to such difficult questions in 16 pages). The drama (especially the last few lines) felt very forced (by today's standards). Found it slightly funny because Socrates comes off as a bit of a dick here, as what he says can easily be read as heavily sarcastic nowadays. ( )
  yuef3i | Sep 19, 2021 |
definition of piety
  ritaer | May 3, 2021 |
A good introductory text to Socrates in particular and Platonic dialogues in general. Euthyphro and Socrates run into each other in the agora and end up using the dialectical mode to try to answer the question of what piety is. Of course, Euthyphro becomes somewhat exasperated and ends up telling Socrates, "Yeah, OK, I would stick around and discuss this all over again, but I've gotta run." The point of the text isn't to define piety, but rather to show how one should philosophically approach defining it. The reader is left to continue the inquiry. ( )
  chrisvia | Apr 29, 2021 |
Showing 4 of 4
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ne day in 399BC in the Athenian Agora, shortly before his trial for impiety, Socrates meet Euthyphro, another citizen involved in a religious suit and their subsequent conversation, whether fact or fiction or a mixture of the two is vividly portrayed by Plato in his short dialogue Socrates being prosecuted for his supposed failure to acknowledge the gods is shown to have more concern for religious matters than his somewhat naive friend; at the same time, however, Socrates' probing about the logical inconsistencies in Euthyphro's views about piety and the gods reveal him as a radical critic of Athenian social and moral values. The simplicity of the style of Plato's Greek belies the dramatic richness of texture and subtle humour of the characterisation which makes this dialogue such a rewarding read for students with only a few years of Greek. A full vocabulary and grammatical notes on the text are matched by detailed discussion of social religious and philosophical content.

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