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The Hawk That Dare Not Hunt by Day (1975)

by Scott O'Dell

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575432,303 (3.5)None
Amid political turmoil and threats of plague, young Tom Barton accepts the risks of helping William Tyndale publish and smuggle into England the Bible he has translated into English.
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This is excellent writing about a lively time in history depicting William Tyndale, a man whose actions were quietly heroic insofar as he fueled the Protestant Reformation by translating The Bible into English. O'Dell provides a moving plot by making the narrator a young English smuggler whose work involves bringing bibles to a country hungry for change. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
This is excellent writing about a lively time in history depicting William Tyndale, a man whose actions were quietly heroic insofar as he fueled the Protestant Reformation by translating The Bible into English. O'Dell provides a moving plot by making the narrator a young English smuggler whose work involves bringing bibles to a country hungry for change. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
A more engrossing book than I initially thought it would be. This book tells the story of William Tyndale and the smuggling into England of the English Bible. The fates of some of the characters saddened me, though I suppose since it is based on history these ends were inevitable. It is very descriptive on some points and cursory on others, almost as if this book is simply picking up where another left off. Perhaps O'Dell assumed that the reader had more knowledge of that time period (of which I have next to none).
  barefeet4 | Mar 16, 2012 |
This novel brings William Tyndale and the times he lived in, to life. Often we hear the dry facts about the Bible and how it has been protected and translated for us all to read, but sometimes we do not realize the drama that goes with those facts. Tyndale put his life on the line because he was committed and convinced that every man and woman should be able to read the Bible for themselves. The leaders of the Church in the 1500's, did not agree. This story is packed with adventure, smuggling, the plague and betrayal. It does not move slowly. ( )
  MrsLee | Jan 21, 2008 |
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Amid political turmoil and threats of plague, young Tom Barton accepts the risks of helping William Tyndale publish and smuggle into England the Bible he has translated into English.

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