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The ACME Novelty Library : Annual Report to Shareholders and Rainy Day… (2005)

by Chris Ware

Series: The Acme Novelty Library (7, 15)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
523336,139 (4.38)1
What would happen if William Faulkner, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett and Eugene O'Neill drew masterful strips for their Sunday comics pages? This volume provides eye-tearingly beautiful depictions of longing, despair, melancholy, disappointment, bleakness, lethargy, abandonment, and relentless parental cruelty.… (more)
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When the Chicago Reader – the old, beefy 4-part Reader from the 1990s and early 2000s – was distributed every Thursday, one of the highlights was always Chris Ware's full-page comics. I clipped and saved many of them (Rusty Brown, Barnaby, Quimby Mouse, Jimmy Corrigan), but as any Chris Ware fan probably knows, having some is not enough. So I couldn't pass up this collection of Acme Novelty Library strips, many with the same characters, when I found it at a bookstore. The large 9"x15" format gives plenty of room to read the small text and get immersed in the intricate layouts that require some patience and study for a full appreciation. While known for complex storyboards with minimal text, certain parts of this great book (history of the Acme Novelty Library, pages reminiscent of the ads in childhood magazines, etc.) show that Ware is as talented a writer of words as a crafter of drawings. ( )
  archidose | Feb 7, 2015 |
The design work is beautiful, superior, every superlative you can imagine, but the how miserable we all are attitude of the content I can do without. Todd Solondz, David Foster Wallace, and Chris Ware all walk into a bar... the joke is on them. Mark Twain had more hope for humanity than this. I love myself. I love being alive. The R. Crumb worshipping, self loathing, misanthropic, stunted adolescent comics auteur crowd has wore itself thin with me. ( )
  librarianbryan | Apr 20, 2012 |
A great collection of Acme comics, beautifully bound. I love that all of the great "back page" ads are in one place, and it's a great book to have out on the coffee table for new fans to discover. ( )
1 vote jentifer | Aug 15, 2009 |
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What would happen if William Faulkner, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett and Eugene O'Neill drew masterful strips for their Sunday comics pages? This volume provides eye-tearingly beautiful depictions of longing, despair, melancholy, disappointment, bleakness, lethargy, abandonment, and relentless parental cruelty.

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