HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed…
Loading...

Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln's Mother and Other… (2009)

by Amy Stewart

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8735610,166 (3.74)72
Recently added byjuliebean, private library, p.moore, GanneC, crazeedi73, ResilienceHub, courtoftheair
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 72 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)


1/2

Like: Wowie!..... What a wonderful little book (and it is Green, just like the plants). Lots of useful information.....

It corroborated what I keep telling people I know: When I eat spicy hot food, I always want a beer, wine, or margarita because it stops the heat and water makes it worse: "Capsaicin does not dissolve in water.......A good stiff drink is also in order, as the alcohol works as a solvent".... To all my friends: I TOLD YOU SO!

Raw Cashews are poisonous, so they are semi-cooked when shelling them.... they Steam them open, thus a form of cooking, eating the shell, even a small amount id toxic.

Nicotine can be deadly absorbed through the skin.....

So why -1/2 star? Because there were no color pictures, the graphics were well executed pencil drawings. ( )
  Auntie-Nanuuq | Jan 18, 2016 |
This is the one book that should be on the reference shelf of every suspense, thriller or horror novelist.

In an A to Z such as you have never read before, Stewart lays out the chemical nature of over two hundred plants that can be used to kill, blind, paralyze or at the very least, leave your victim curled up in bed very ill.

From deadly nightshade to killer algae, ratbane to hemlock, Stewart lays it all out on the line. If you want to kill off your victim in some mysterious, painful and particularly nasty way, she has a toxin to get the job done. White Snake root is what does in Mrs. Lincoln (Abe's mother). Known as milk sickness, the plant contaminated folks in the early-farm life of America, often wiping out entire families.

Written in entertaining jargon, hitting on the scientific, the historical and the medicinal, Stewart enlightens us to the use of weeds, plants and seeds and advises to “consider yourself warned”. ( )
  MarkPSadler | Jan 17, 2016 |
This is the one book that should be on the reference shelf of every suspense, thriller or horror novelist.

In an A to Z such as you have never read before, Stewart lays out the chemical nature of over two hundred plants that can be used to kill, blind, paralyze or at the very least, leave your victim curled up in bed very ill.

From deadly nightshade to killer algae, ratbane to hemlock, Stewart lays it all out on the line. If you want to kill off your victim in some mysterious, painful and particularly nasty way, she has a toxin to get the job done. White Snake root is what does in Mrs. Lincoln (Abe's mother). Known as milk sickness, the plant contaminated folks in the early-farm life of America, often wiping out entire families.

Written in entertaining jargon, hitting on the scientific, the historical and the medicinal, Stewart enlightens us to the use of weeds, plants and seeds and advises to “consider yourself warned”. ( )
  MarkPSadler | Jan 17, 2016 |
This is the one book that should be on the reference shelf of every suspense, thriller or horror novelist.

In an A to Z such as you have never read before, Stewart lays out the chemical nature of over two hundred plants that can be used to kill, blind, paralyze or at the very least, leave your victim curled up in bed very ill.

From deadly nightshade to killer algae, ratbane to hemlock, Stewart lays it all out on the line. If you want to kill off your victim in some mysterious, painful and particularly nasty way, she has a toxin to get the job done. White Snake root is what does in Mrs. Lincoln (Abe's mother). Known as milk sickness, the plant contaminated folks in the early-farm life of America, often wiping out entire families.

Written in entertaining jargon, hitting on the scientific, the historical and the medicinal, Stewart enlightens us to the use of weeds, plants and seeds and advises to “consider yourself warned”. ( )
  MarkPSadler | Jan 17, 2016 |
Offers many interesting facts on plants that people may not have realized were poisonous and many interesting stories on the history of these plants. While the line drawings were beautiful, sometimes I would have appreciated an actual photograph to be sure that the author was referring to the plant I thought she was referring to. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
Wicked Plants is a stroll down a garden path of dread. Some of the most beloved and innocent plants in our own personal edens are villains at their core...Some 3,900 people in the U.S. are injured every year by poking around electrical outlets, while more than 68,000 are poisoned by plants...
added by SqueakyChu | editToronto Star, Leslie Scrivener (Jul 11, 2009)
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Would not the earth, quickened to an evil purpose by the sympathy of his eye, greet him with poisonous shrubs...Would he not suddenly sink into the earth, leaving a barren and blasted spot, where, in due course of time, would be seen deadly nightshade, dogwood, henbane, and whatever else of vegetable wickedness the climate could produce, all flourishing with hideous luxuriance?
--Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter
Dedication
To PSB
First words
A tree sheds poison daggers; a glistening red seed stops the heart; a shrub causes intolerable pain; a vine intoxicates; a leaf triggers a war.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
(from the back of the book) A tree that sheds poison daggers; a glistening red seed that stops the heart; a shrub that causes paralysis; a vine that strangles; and a leaf that triggered a war. Amy Stewart, bestselling author of Flower Confidential, takes on over two hundred of Mother Nature's most appalling creations in an A to Z of plants that kill, maim, intoxicate, and otherwise offend. Menacing botanical illustrations render a ghastly portrait of evildoers that may be lurking on your own backyard. Drawing on history, medicine, science, and legend, this compendium of bloodcurdling botany will entertain, enlighten, and alarm even the most intrepid gardeners and nature lovers.
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

Stewart takes on more than 200 of Mother Nature's most appalling creations and offers this A-to-Z compendium of plants that kill, maim, intoxicate, and otherwise offend.

» see all 3 descriptions

LibraryThing Author

Amy Stewart is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
572 wanted
4 pay5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.74)
0.5
1 1
1.5 1
2 8
2.5 2
3 44
3.5 11
4 82
4.5 13
5 20

Audible.com

2 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 103,166,649 books! | Top bar: Always visible