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Finite and Infinite Games: James Carse by…
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Finite and Infinite Games: James Carse (original 1986; edition 2013)

by James Carse (Author)

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1,2482714,845 (3.82)11
Philosophy. Nonfiction. HTML:"There are at least two kinds of games," states James P. Carse as he begins this extraordinary book. "One could be called finite; the other infinite. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing the play."
/> Finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life; they are played in order to be won, which is when they end. But infinite games are more mysterious. Their object is not winning, but ensuring the continuation of play. The rules may change, the boundaries may change, even the participants may change‚??as long as the game is never allowed to come to an end.

What are infinite games? How do they affect the ways we play our finite games? What are we doing when we play‚??finitely or infinitely? And how can infinite games affect the ways in which we live our lives?

Carse explores these questions with stunning elegance, teasing out of his distinctions a universe of observation and insight, noting where and why and how we play, finitely and infinitely. He surveys our world‚??from the finite games of the playing field and playing board to the infinite games found in culture and religion‚??leaving all we think we know illuminated and transformed. Along the way, Carse finds new ways of understanding everything, from how an actress portrays a role to how we engage in sex, from the nature of evil to the nature of science. Finite games, he shows, may offer wealth and status, power and glory, but infinite games offer something far more subtle and far grander.

Carse has written a book rich in insight and aphorism. Already an international literary event, Finite and Infinite Games is certain to be argued about and celebrated for years to come. Reading it is the first step in learning to play the in… (more)
Member:JollyContrarian
Title:Finite and Infinite Games: James Carse
Authors:James Carse (Author)
Info:Free Press (2013), Edition: 01, 160 pages
Collections:Completed
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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Finite and Infinite Games: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility by James P. Carse (1986)

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https://jollycontrarian.com/index.php?title=Finite_and_Infinite_Games

If there is one thing to take from this article, please make it this: read James P. Carse’s magnificently aphoristic Finite and Infinite Games: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility and at all costs go out of your way to avoid Simon Sinek’s thoroughly wretched adaptation, The Infinite Game. ( )
  JollyContrarian | Dec 2, 2023 |
An extremely abstract, existential modernist philosophical text providing some broadly applicable ontological categories for human activity. It's certainly a way to think about the world and your place in it. There are a lot of "weird" assertions in here, and certainly some uncomfortable and questionable ones. ( )
  quavmo | Oct 26, 2023 |
This was definitely a worthwhile read. In fact, I should read a second time before reviewing.

That said, I found the opening premise quite interesting, and some of the expansion on it quite worthwhile. But... frankly, I did not follow everything here. I think part of it is that I'm not sure I agree with all of it.

I don't know that infinite players are actually 'better', and that is clearly the judgement expressed. A sincere religious fundamentalist seems an infinite player; so does a sincere terrorist. Though Carse clearly would not agree, I think a 'true believe' in almost any thing would fit... even though embracers of ideology are called out here.

Yeah... disagree on points AND need to reread. ( )
  dcunning11235 | Aug 12, 2023 |
wouldnt wish this on my worst enemy. this book peaked at the first sentence and steadily regressed until i wanted to kill myself by the last word. i would rather puncture my eyes than read this ever again. or blow my brains out than think of its contents. there are like 5 interesting tidbidts--which are only interesting relative to the garbage that surrounds them--that i wish this author (if i can call him that! his title should be revoked!) had just listed in bullet points along with the first sentence (which again, was the book's strongest point).

an interesting subject gone terribly wrong. 0/5. if you saw any value in this book i worry for you. ( )
  yacobbb | Jul 5, 2023 |
The core of this book is to differentiate finite games, that has an end, from infinite games, that is just for playing. The author makes the point that infinite games are better and less paradoxical.

I associate the talk with the teal thoughts on building better organizations. I also think of the book [b:This Life: Secular Faith and Spiritual Freedom|35969561|This Life Secular Faith and Spiritual Freedom|Martin Hägglund|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1541968760l/35969561._SY75_.jpg|57532947] wish talks on similar matters, but the fact that we are finite is the reason why we can be and do good. Somehow I see these thoughts reaching out and connecting in my head. We are finite beings taking part in an infinite game.

I think this book will give me more insights on a second read. ( )
  paven | Jan 26, 2021 |
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Alisa, Keene, and Jamie, of course.
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There are at least two kinds of games. One could be called finite, the other infinite.
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Philosophy. Nonfiction. HTML:"There are at least two kinds of games," states James P. Carse as he begins this extraordinary book. "One could be called finite; the other infinite. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing the play."
Finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life; they are played in order to be won, which is when they end. But infinite games are more mysterious. Their object is not winning, but ensuring the continuation of play. The rules may change, the boundaries may change, even the participants may change‚??as long as the game is never allowed to come to an end.

What are infinite games? How do they affect the ways we play our finite games? What are we doing when we play‚??finitely or infinitely? And how can infinite games affect the ways in which we live our lives?

Carse explores these questions with stunning elegance, teasing out of his distinctions a universe of observation and insight, noting where and why and how we play, finitely and infinitely. He surveys our world‚??from the finite games of the playing field and playing board to the infinite games found in culture and religion‚??leaving all we think we know illuminated and transformed. Along the way, Carse finds new ways of understanding everything, from how an actress portrays a role to how we engage in sex, from the nature of evil to the nature of science. Finite games, he shows, may offer wealth and status, power and glory, but infinite games offer something far more subtle and far grander.

Carse has written a book rich in insight and aphorism. Already an international literary event, Finite and Infinite Games is certain to be argued about and celebrated for years to come. Reading it is the first step in learning to play the in

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