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The Historical Christ and the Theological Jesus

by Jr. Dale C. Allison

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971224,299 (4.09)None
Informally presents and evaluates complex--sometimes troubling--issues in scholarly discussion of Jesus Christ. "Whatever one makes of these pages, they are the stammerings neither of an apologist nor of a skeptic but instead of an oft-confused Protestant who has come to his conclusions, modest as they are, quite gradually, and who may alter his uncertain mind about much tomorrow. Of two things only do I feel assured. The first is that, as unchanging things do not grow -- rocks remain rocks -- informed changes of mind should be welcomed, not feared. The second is this: the unexamined Christ is not worth having." -- from the introduction  In this book, which he describes as "my personal testimony to doubt seeking understanding," Dale Allison thoughtfully addresses ongoing historical-theological questions concerning Jesus. What should one think of the modern quest for the historical Jesus when there is such enduring discord among the experts, and when personal agendas play such a large role in the reconstructions? How much history is in the Gospels, and how much history does Christian theology require that there be? How does the quest impinge upon conventional Christian beliefs, and what might it contribute to contemporary theological reflection? The Historical Christ and the Theological Jesus is the personal statement of lessons that a respected participant in the quest has learned throughout the course of his academic career.… (more)
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NCLA Review - Take a look at this title. We are familiar with each of these words, yet the title itself is something of a challenge. Prof. Allison of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, studies Jesus from both historical and theological perspectives. He tries to determine how much history is in the Gospels, and how much history Christian theology requires that there be. This is one of the key topics in academic New Testament study. This little book is difficult—but rewarding. Read it with your discussion group, and join one of the most important discussions in Jesus research today. Rating: 2, for large collections. —RO ( )
  ncla | Jan 1, 2011 |
Anyone who embarks upon historical Jesus research will need to read this book. Those who do not neglect to do so at their own peril. Allison's contribution is a vital one, worthy, in my opinion, of being placed in the short list of books that have shaped or now will shaped or now will shape the landscape of biblical studies.
added by Christa_Josh | editJournal of the Evangelical Theological Society, Joseph B. Modica (Jun 1, 2010)
 
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Informally presents and evaluates complex--sometimes troubling--issues in scholarly discussion of Jesus Christ. "Whatever one makes of these pages, they are the stammerings neither of an apologist nor of a skeptic but instead of an oft-confused Protestant who has come to his conclusions, modest as they are, quite gradually, and who may alter his uncertain mind about much tomorrow. Of two things only do I feel assured. The first is that, as unchanging things do not grow -- rocks remain rocks -- informed changes of mind should be welcomed, not feared. The second is this: the unexamined Christ is not worth having." -- from the introduction  In this book, which he describes as "my personal testimony to doubt seeking understanding," Dale Allison thoughtfully addresses ongoing historical-theological questions concerning Jesus. What should one think of the modern quest for the historical Jesus when there is such enduring discord among the experts, and when personal agendas play such a large role in the reconstructions? How much history is in the Gospels, and how much history does Christian theology require that there be? How does the quest impinge upon conventional Christian beliefs, and what might it contribute to contemporary theological reflection? The Historical Christ and the Theological Jesus is the personal statement of lessons that a respected participant in the quest has learned throughout the course of his academic career.

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In this book, which he describes as "my personal testimony to doubt seeking understanding," Dale Allison thoughtfully addresses ongoing historical-theological questions concerning Jesus. What should one think of the modern quest for the historical Jesus when there is such enduring discord among the experts, and when personal agendas play such a large role in the reconstructions? How much history is in the Gospels, and how much history does Christian theology require that there be? How does the quest impinge upon conventional Christian beliefs, and what might it contribute to contemporary theological reflection? The Historical Christ and the Theological Jesus is the personal statement of lessons that a respected participant in the quest has learned throughout the course of his academic career.

Contents: Introduction: A brief overview -- The problem of theological utility --The enduring discord of the experts -- The enduring challenge of personal predilection -- The perceptions of others and personal identity -- Disputed questions -- How much history does theology require? -- How should we treat our texts? -- How might one come to know Jesus? -- How to proceed -- The wrong tools for the wrong job -- The general and the particular -- Miracles here, there, and everywhere -- Some difficult conclusions -- Christology : too low and too high -- Eschatology : here to stay -- Context : gone for good -- Some personal impressions -- Contradictions : divine love and human woe -- Imagination : ought over is -- Synthesis : the coincidence of opposites.
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