HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Timequake by Kurt Vonnegut
Loading...

Timequake (original 1997; edition 1998)

by Kurt Vonnegut (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,945491,699 (3.54)99
There's been a timequake. And everyone-even you-must live the decade between February 17, 1991 and February 17, 2001 over again. The trick is that we all have to do exactly the same things as we did the first time-minute by minute, hour by hour, year by year, betting on the wrong horse again, marrying the wrong person again. Why? You'll have to ask the old science fiction writer, Kilgore Trout. This was all his idea.… (more)
Member:coolkidstuck
Title:Timequake
Authors:Kurt Vonnegut (Author)
Info:Berkley (1998), 250 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

Timequake by Kurt Vonnegut (1997)

  1. 11
    A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr. (danconsiglio)
    danconsiglio: For people who like their books to hurt like f**king hell.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 99 mentions

English (47)  Portuguese (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (49)
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
Timequake is the seventh Vonnegut book I've read, and by far the most hit or miss. His digressions, at points, are elegantly fluid and insightful; at others, they're rambling and repetitive, rough drafts of terrain he would cover in Man Without A Country, and attempts to use historical tragedies as justification for cynicism, which to me always sounds an awful lot like laziness. He also goes on and on about how books and theater are somehow more worthwhile than movies and TV, bloviates about the need for a family unit, and claims young people don't care about Abraham Lincoln thanks to television - real old man stuff. While there's some good moments here, it's too cranky without being much fun. I would direct readers interested in later Vonnegut to Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian and Man Without A Country, which are livelier and more enthusiastic than this book, which is pretty much only for completists. ( )
  greggmaxwellparker | May 17, 2021 |
As it says on the back cover:

"a wise, winning and utterly charming concoction of fiction, commentary and autobiography."

I fucking love Vonnegut.
Ting-a-ling. ( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
Didn't really do it for me, though there are funny bits and good bits. ( )
  dllh | Jan 6, 2021 |
Probably my least favorite of Vonnegut's books. It's still okay, but too self-referential and solipsistic. I'm surprised a reference to this book hasn't shown up in Lost yet.... Oh right, Abrams only likes to mention the popular books. ( )
  octoberdad | Dec 16, 2020 |
A fascinating and fun blend of fiction and autogiography. I suppose this is not too surprizing, given that Vonnegut's real life is too unbelievable for fiction. ( )
  dandailey | Nov 8, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
Anyway, we should salute Vonnegut for giving us this, even if, as he suggests, he just tossed it off. It's not just his will that's free, but his mind. Timequake, both all over the place and perfectly fixed at the same time, is a sure-footed exemplar of the dictum that appears on page 191: 'Listen: We are here on Earth to fart around. Don't let anybody tell you any different!'
added by andyl | editThe Guardian, Nicholas Lezard (Jul 25, 1998)
 

» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kurt Vonnegutprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bacon,PaulCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
In memory of Seymour Lawrence,

a romantic and great publisher

of curious tales told with ink

on bleached and flattened wood pulp
First words
Ernest Hemingway in 1952 published in Life magazine a long short story called The Old Man and the Sea.
Quotations
"You were sick, but now you're well again and there's work to do."

"Get a grip on your self, you brainless nervous breakdown."

"Every effort shall be made to make every person feel that he or she will be sorely missed when he or she is gone."

Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

There's been a timequake. And everyone-even you-must live the decade between February 17, 1991 and February 17, 2001 over again. The trick is that we all have to do exactly the same things as we did the first time-minute by minute, hour by hour, year by year, betting on the wrong horse again, marrying the wrong person again. Why? You'll have to ask the old science fiction writer, Kilgore Trout. This was all his idea.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.54)
0.5 1
1 27
1.5 10
2 103
2.5 22
3 314
3.5 62
4 360
4.5 19
5 179

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,524,343 books! | Top bar: Always visible