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Poems

by Anna Akhmatova

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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445843,564 (4.09)7
Ever since her death in 1966 Anna Akhmatova has been recognized as the greatest modern Russian poet. A rich and representative selection of Akhmatova's work--from her poignant, deeply personal love poems to her haunting laments for the martyrs of the Stalinist purges--has been newly translated by the American poet Lyn Coffin. In her finely crafted translations Coffin has been uniquely successful in reproducing the directness and striking effects characteristic of Akhmatova's poetry, and she is the first to remain true to Akhmatova's rhyme and cadence. The poems are prefaced by a thoughtful introduction by the poet Joseph Brodsky, a friend of Akhmatova in her later years.… (more)
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» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
I don't get these poems easily--I can't just pick this book up and understand. Still, there are some that strike immediately:

"The three things he loved most in life
Were white peacocks, music at mass,
And tattered maps of America.
He didn't like kids who cried and he
Didn't like raspberry jam with tea
Or womanish hysteria.
...And I was, like it or not, his wife." ( )
1 vote wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
There are some works for which the least said is the better. Any fulsome review would be sure to crush the thing. Delicate, hardy, economical, restrained, yet packing an emotional sock in the jaw. One leaves these works with a sense of awe at the power of words. ( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
There are some works for which the least said is the better. Any fulsome review would be sure to crush the thing. Delicate, hardy, economical, restrained, yet packing an emotional sock in the jaw. One leaves these works with a sense of awe at the power of words. ( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
There are some works for which the least said is the better. Any fulsome review would be sure to crush the thing. Delicate, hardy, economical, restrained, yet packing an emotional sock in the jaw. One leaves these works with a sense of awe at the power of words. ( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
Infused with great sadness for what became of the generation she grew up with and for her country; some of her earlier poems are lighthearted, witty, sweet. I wonder what she would have written if her life had not been bound fast with tragedy. A few thoughts on one of the poems here: http://rosemaryandreadingglasses.wordpress.com/2013/04/30/like-an-ermine-mantle-...
  Oh_Carolyn | Jul 18, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Anna Akhmatovaprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hayward, MaxTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kunitz, StanleyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Ever since her death in 1966 Anna Akhmatova has been recognized as the greatest modern Russian poet. A rich and representative selection of Akhmatova's work--from her poignant, deeply personal love poems to her haunting laments for the martyrs of the Stalinist purges--has been newly translated by the American poet Lyn Coffin. In her finely crafted translations Coffin has been uniquely successful in reproducing the directness and striking effects characteristic of Akhmatova's poetry, and she is the first to remain true to Akhmatova's rhyme and cadence. The poems are prefaced by a thoughtful introduction by the poet Joseph Brodsky, a friend of Akhmatova in her later years.

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