HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Number : A Completely Different Way to…
Loading...

The Number : A Completely Different Way to Think About the Rest of Your…

by Lee Eisenberg

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3411149,066 (2.96)2

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
Do not read this book if you are younger than 45 and paranoid. I freaked out completely after reading this book ... I totally need to save more for my retirement. ( )
  DBrigandi | Jul 3, 2017 |
Do not read this book if you are younger than 45 and paranoid. I freaked out completely after reading this book ... I totally need to save more for my retirement. ( )
  DBrigandi | Jul 3, 2017 |
This is a book that most should read because it will force you to think about your looming future. The Number refers to the number each of us believes we'll need to have upon the day of our retirement. It differs completely for each of us. Have modest needs? it could be small. Lead a great, costly life now and wish to maintain it? It could be much, much higher. The book address how the number changes with life events like more toys, the arrival of children, the return of college children, etc. it will also point out items most do not really dwell on. We're living much longer, which means we'll need more money, health care is much better and much more costly. So, be prepared, if you hate thinking of your financial future, to be very uncomfortable, but don't say you weren't warned. ( )
  RalphLagana | Jan 23, 2016 |
Donna Boone's Office
  Farella | Apr 12, 2011 |
This is an excellent book for retirement planning. It is very simple.How much money you need ? Figure out how long you expect to live after retirement,then plan to withdraw. Well now that I am writing my evaluation in 2010 after the meltdown I am thinking differently about this book. It assumes that you put away so much money and then can count on a regular percentage on your investment to live on. Doesn't work that way anymore it seems.
  carterchristian1 | Dec 10, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743270312, Hardcover)

Do you know your Number?

What happens if you don't make it to your Number?

Do you have a plan?

The often-avoided, anxiety-riddled discussion about financial planning for a secure and fulfilling future has been given a new starting point in The Number by Lee Eisenberg. The buzz of professionals and financial industry insiders everywhere, the Number represents the amount of money and resources people will need to enjoy the active life they desire, especially post-career. Backed by imaginative reporting and insights, Eisenberg urges people to assume control and responsibility for their standard of living, and take greater aim on their long-term aspirations.

In 1999, Eisenberg was in the midst of downshifting from having served as the Editor-in-Chief of Esquire and other high profile positions. He was "half-in, half-out of the workplace" with an enviable consulting position at Time, Inc., and a family comfortably settled in the suburbs. That's when he received an unexpected offer from the Wisconsin-based Lands' End which, in the end, he couldn't resist. It meant uprooting his family and moving to the rural heartland, and taking on the challenges of an entirely new way of life. Before the move, he admits, "I was worried about the Number." Once in Wisconsin, Eisenberg confesses that the "Number was leading us around by our noses."

From Wall Street to Main Street USA, The Number means different things to different people. It is constantly fluctuating in people's minds and bank accounts. To some, the Number symbolizes freedom, validation of career success, the ticket to luxurious indulgences and spiritual exploration; to others, it represents the bewildering and nonsensical nightmare of an impoverished existence creeping up on them in their old age, a seemingly hopeless inevitability that they would rather simply ignore than confront. People are highly private and closed-mouthed when it comes to discussing their Numbers, or lack thereof, for fear they might either reveal too much or display ineptitude.

In The Number, Eisenberg describes this secret anxiety as the "Last Taboo," a conundrum snared in confusing financial lingo. He sorts through the fancy jargon and translates the Number into commonsense advice that resonates just as easily with the aging gods and goddesses of corporate boardrooms as it does with ordinary people who are beginning to realize that retirement is now just a couple of decades away. Believing that the Number is as much about self-worth as it is net worth, Eisenberg strives to help readers better understand and more efficiently manage all aspects of their life, money, and pursuit of happiness.

* According to Eisenberg, "Number chasers" fall into four personality types:

--"Procrastinators" enter their forties and fifties ensconced in a cloud of avoidance and denial about the years ahead of them, or simply do not understand investing in their futures.

--"Pluckers" often lazily or arrogantly pull ephemeral, albeit specific, Numbers from thin air with little attention to developing a realistic and coherent plan to achieve their goals.

--"Plotters" crunch every practical aspect of their financial history, hoping to cement their Number in black and white, even at the expense of not having fun and leisure.

--"Probers" visualize their Numbers not as an end but as the means to pursuing dreams and passions, and completing inner and outer journeys to self-fulfillment.

* The current "Debt Warp" is the "silent Number killer that afflicts young and old" that has been brought on by our "whip-it-out credit-card culture."

* The "Lost Years" describes a person's 20s, 30s, and 40s wherein sensible financial foundation-building bows to oblivious and careless spending, and the tug-of-war dichotomy between the "old Rest of Your Life" and the "new Rest of Your Life."

* A s...

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:15 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The anxiety-riddled discussion about financial planning for a secure and fulfilling future has been given a new starting point in this book. The Number represents the amount of money and resources people will need to enjoy the active life they desire, especially post-career. From Wall Street to Main Street USA, The Number means different things to different people. It is constantly fluctuating in people's minds and bank accounts. To some, it symbolizes freedom, validation, success; to others, an impoverished existence creeping up on them in their old age. Believing that the Number is as much about self-worth as it is net worth, Eisenberg translates the Number into commonsense advice. This book is not an investment guide, but rather a look behind our most common financial and emotional conflicts and how we can begin to get a grip on them.--From publisher description.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (2.96)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 10
2.5 3
3 20
3.5 1
4 7
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 136,504,961 books! | Top bar: Always visible