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The Crack-Up by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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The Crack-Up (original 1945; edition 2009)

by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Author)

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9151023,158 (3.85)15
Compiled and published after Fitzgerald's death by his friend, the prominent critic and editor Edmund Wilson,The Crack-Up is a collection of writings that chronicle the author's state of mind and personal perspective on events, fellow writers and public figures of the 1920s and 1930s. In addition to articles and essays such as the celebrated title piece, this volume includes a selection of Fitzgerald's notebooks, which - as well as being a repository of anecdotes and witty lines - provide a fascinating behind-the-scenes glimpse into the novelist's creative process, with passages that would be reworked intohis fiction. An entertaining and eclectic miscellany that sheds light on the author and his times,The Crack-Up is an invaluable companion to such well-known works asThe Great Gatsby andTender Is the Night.… (more)
Member:krbex
Title:The Crack-Up
Authors:F. Scott Fitzgerald (Author)
Info:New Directions (2009), Edition: Reprint, 306 pages
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The Crack-Up by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1945)

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» See also 15 mentions

English (8)  French (1)  All languages (9)
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Essays collected and published posthumously, purportedly as near to an autobiographical account as Fitzgerald gave of himself.
  PendleHillLibrary | Aug 26, 2022 |
A collection of 8 of Fitzgerald's essays, over 100 pages from his notebooks, and selected correspondence.

The essays "Echoes of the Jazz Age", "My Lost City", "Sleeping and Waking", "The Crack-Up", and "Early Success" are excellent, demonstrating a perspective and a sense of self-awareness that I was not aware Fitzgerald had possessed.

The excerpts from The Notebooks make for good casual (bathroom?) browsing.

The rest of this collection is, as they say, for the completist only. ( )
  mkfs | Aug 13, 2022 |



Among F. Scott Fitzgerald’s final publications was a series of short articles done for Esquire Magazine in 1936. They are titled The Crack-Up and they deal primarily with his own sudden realization, at the age of 39 and only four years from his own death, that his life had, in his own eyes, been a failure.

There is a sense of sadness that runs through his always elegant prose that is heart-rending. Early in the essays he states

The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.

I could not help thinking that his brilliant writing, which he must surely have recognized as such, and his feelings of abject failure, were those “two opposed ideas” and that his great fear was that he would lose his “ability to function.”

As a general rule, I am more interested in what an author writes and the ideas and meanings I can come away with from his body of work than the author’s actual life. Fitzgerald is almost an exception to that rule. So much of what makes him a fascination is his own complicated and flawed life, his dealings with the madness of Zelda, his struggle to belong to a world he never feels quite comfortable in. He is Nick Carroway in so many ways, observing the glitz and glitter and often wondering just what he is doing in this place and time.

He speaks briefly about his own pursuit of Zelda as a young man who cannot support her family lifestyle and his change of fortune when he initially made good on his writing career.

The man with the jingle of money in his pocket who married the girl a year later would always cherish an abiding distrust, an animosity, toward the leisure class -- not the conviction of a revolutionist but the smoldering hatred of a peasant.

Even Scott realized in the end that his attempts to run with the “in-crowd” had tinted his life a different color than he had expected or wished. The essays are part and parcel of this realization, but, like all things Fitzgerald, there is a bit of duplicity there as well, a tiny indicator that the writer is still talking to you, not the man. Perhaps, by this juncture, the man is irretrievably lost.
( )
1 vote mattorsara | Aug 11, 2022 |
5698. The Crack-Up, by F. Scott Fitzgerald (read 7 Jul 2020) This book's editor was Edmund Wilson and the book was published by New Directions. There is a lot of uninteresting stuff in the book, including snippets of prose Fitzgerald collected or wrote with the idea of using such in his writing. Fitzgerald died at 44 in 1940 and became much more celebrated after he died,.
. ( )
  Schmerguls | Aug 18, 2020 |
After all, didn't Gilles Deleuze use The Crack Up essay, through the perspective of Melanie Klein, to substantiate his interpretation of Sigmund Freud's "death drive" in his 1969 book The Logic of Sense?
  onesmallhole | Jun 12, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
". . . a collection of Fitzgerald's unpublished sketches, notebooks, letters and doggerel . . . For all their inanities and juvenile posturings, for all their borrowed melancholy and half-formed wisdom, these notes are a blurred but fascinating blueprint of the development -- and the breakdown -- of a major literary talent."
added by GYKM | editNew York Times, William Du Bois (Jul 23, 1945)
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
F. Scott Fitzgeraldprimary authorall editionscalculated
Wilson, EdmundEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Bishop, John PealeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dos Passos, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Eliot, T.S.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rosenfeld, PaulContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Stein, GertrudeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wescott, GlenwayContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wharton, EdithContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wolfe, ThomasContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Antolín Rato, MarianoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Aury, DominiqueTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grenier, RogerPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Laughlin, JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mayoux, SuzanneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sollers, PhilippePostfacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Compiled and published after Fitzgerald's death by his friend, the prominent critic and editor Edmund Wilson,The Crack-Up is a collection of writings that chronicle the author's state of mind and personal perspective on events, fellow writers and public figures of the 1920s and 1930s. In addition to articles and essays such as the celebrated title piece, this volume includes a selection of Fitzgerald's notebooks, which - as well as being a repository of anecdotes and witty lines - provide a fascinating behind-the-scenes glimpse into the novelist's creative process, with passages that would be reworked intohis fiction. An entertaining and eclectic miscellany that sheds light on the author and his times,The Crack-Up is an invaluable companion to such well-known works asThe Great Gatsby andTender Is the Night.

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