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Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St. John

by Isaac Newton

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Sir Isaac Newton's commentaries on the Book of Daniel and the Book of Revelation. Published in 1733. Newton wrote an entire book interpreting the prophecies of the Biblical books of Daniel and the Revelation of John (also called "The Apocalypse"). His insights vary in several respects from the "standard" modern Christian interpretations, and his perspicacity might well be vindicated as the rest of these prophecies are yet fulfilled. Besides his immense intellect, he provides a huge contribution which few can supply even today. Newton had a wealth of knowledge of ancient history, obtained by reading mountains of documents in the original Greek, Latin and Hebrew, in which he saw many of those prophecies literally fulfilled long after they had been revealed. To him, it was a proof of the foreknowledge of God, which was his purpose in writing the book.… (more)
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NO OF PAGES: 323 SUB CAT I: Prophecy SUB CAT II: SUB CAT III: DESCRIPTION: #ErrorNOTES: Donated by LaVerne Stanley. SUBTITLE:
  BeitHallel | Feb 18, 2011 |
NO OF PAGES: 323 SUB CAT I: Prophecy SUB CAT II: SUB CAT III: DESCRIPTION: 1733. In two parts. Part I contains observations upon the prophecies of Daniel, including an introduction concerning the compilers of the Books of the Old Testament, prophetic language, various prophecies, and a myriad of discussion relative to the prophecies of Daniel. Part II contains the observations upon the Apocalypse of St. John, including an introduction concerning the time when the Apocalypse was written, the relation of this Apocalypse to the Book of the Law of Moses, and the relation the prophecy of John has to those of Daniel. Due to the age and scarcity of the original we reproduced, some pages may be spotty, faded or difficult to read. Written in Old English.NOTES: Copied off the Internet. SUBTITLE:
  BeitHallel | Feb 18, 2011 |
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Sir Isaac Newton's commentaries on the Book of Daniel and the Book of Revelation. Published in 1733. Newton wrote an entire book interpreting the prophecies of the Biblical books of Daniel and the Revelation of John (also called "The Apocalypse"). His insights vary in several respects from the "standard" modern Christian interpretations, and his perspicacity might well be vindicated as the rest of these prophecies are yet fulfilled. Besides his immense intellect, he provides a huge contribution which few can supply even today. Newton had a wealth of knowledge of ancient history, obtained by reading mountains of documents in the original Greek, Latin and Hebrew, in which he saw many of those prophecies literally fulfilled long after they had been revealed. To him, it was a proof of the foreknowledge of God, which was his purpose in writing the book.

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