HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Bleeding Borders: Race, Gender, and Violence…
Loading...

Bleeding Borders: Race, Gender, and Violence in Pre-Civil War Kansas…

by Kristen Tegtmeier Oertel

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
101880,191 (3)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

The words of "bleeding" and "borders" contained in the title refers to the violence and terrorism resulting from the clash of interests between pro-slavery and anti-slavery forces that took place along Kansas-Missouri border prior to the American Civil War. Extremist from both sides were drawn to this part of the country to champion their cause in determining whether Kansas Territory would become a slave or free state. These conflicts in many ways served as a precursor to the Civil War that followed. The major power brokers (mostly white males) in this phase of history have been well documented by other historians. This book focuses on the activities of the less visible participants (women, Indians and slaves) of this historical era. The book goes on to explore how contrasting cultural values and fear of miscegenation motivated the different political interests.

The writing is very readable, but it has the flavor on an academic book with frequent references to material covered by other historians. Because of the nature of the subject, it necessarily ends up describing scattered events and personalities which limits the emotional identification by the reader with stories in the book. Consequently, I suppose it will fail to capture the attention of the popular reading audience. Nevertheless, it tells the stories of many overlooked ordinary people who worked hard at living and surviving. These are stories that deserve to be told and remembered. Their hard work laid the foundation of our current civilization. ( )
  Clif | Jul 17, 2009 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0807133906, Hardcover)

In Bleeding Borders, Kristen Tegtmeier Oertel offers a fresh, multifaceted interpretation of the quintessential sectional conflict in pre-Civil War Kansas. Instead of focusing on the white, male politicians and settlers who vied for control of the Kansas territorial legislature, Oertel explores the crucial roles Native Americans, African Americans, and white women played in the literal and rhetorical battle between proslavery and antislavery settlers in the region. She brings attention to the local debates and the diverse peoples who participated in them during that contentious period.

Oertel begins by detailing the settlement of eastern Kansas by emigrant Indian tribes and explores their interaction with the growing number of white settlers in the region. She analyzes the attempts by southerners to plant slavery in Kansas and the ultimately successful resistance of slaves and abolitionists. Oertel then considers how crude frontier living conditions, Indian conflict, political upheaval, and sectional violence reshaped traditional Victorian gender roles in Kansas and explores women's participation in the political and physical conflicts between proslavery and antislavery settlers.

Oertel goes on to examine northern and southern definitions of "true manhood" and how competing ideas of masculinity infused political and sectional tensions. She concludes with an analysis of miscegenation--not only how racial mixing between Indians, slaves, and whites influenced events in territorial Kansas, but more importantly, how the fear of miscegenation fueled both proslavery and antislavery arguments about the need for civil war.

As Oertel demonstrates, the players in Bleeding Kansas used weapons other than their Sharpes rifles and Bowie knives to wage war over the extension of slavery: they attacked each other's cultural values and struggled to assert their own political wills. They jealously guarded ideals of manhood, womanhood, and whiteness even as the presence of Indians and blacks and the debate over slavery raised serious questions about the efficacy of these principles. Oertel argues that, ultimately, many Native Americans, blacks, and women shaped the political and cultural terrain in ways that ensured the destruction of slavery, but they, along with their white male counterparts, failed to defeat the resilient power of white supremacy.

Moving beyond a conventional political history of Bleeding Kansas, Bleeding Borders breaks new ground by revealing how the struggles of this highly diverse region contributed to the national move toward disunion and how the ideologies that governed race and gender relations were challenged as North, South, and West converged on the border between slavery and freedom.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:46 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

In Bleeding Borders, Kristen Tegtmeier Oertel offers a fresh, multifaceted interpretation of the quintessential sectional conflict in pre-Civil War Kansas. Instead of focusing on the white, male politicians and settlers who vied for control of the Kansas territorial legislature, Oertel explores the crucial roles Native Americans, African Americans, and white women played in the literal and rhetorical battle between proslavery and antislavery settlers in the region. She brings attention to the local debates and the diverse peoples who participated in them during that contentious period. Oertel b.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 124,576,042 books! | Top bar: Always visible