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Sociobiology: The Abridged Edition by Edward…
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Sociobiology: The Abridged Edition (1980)

by Edward O. Wilson

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    The Ancestor's Tale: A Pilgrimage to the Dawn of Life by Richard Dawkins (waltzmn)
    waltzmn: Edward O. Wilson's Sociobiology is a textbook, and at times reads like one. It is also highly controversial -- not so much in scientific circles as in popular. Those who wish to ease into the issues it tackles would be well-served by Richard Dawkins's most accessible work, The Ancestor's Tale. It won't teach you much of the material in Sociobiology, but it will supply a good background in the relevant manner of thinking.… (more)
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Preface to the Abridged Edition -- Modern sociobiology is being created by gifted individuals who work primarily in population biology, invertebrate zoology, including entomology especially, and vertebrate zoology.
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This is an abridged version of E. O. Wilson's Sociobiology. Please do not combine with the full-length work. Thank you.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0674816242, Paperback)

E.O. Wilson defines sociobiology as "the systematic study of the biological basis of all social behavior," the central theoretical problem of which is the question of how behaviors that seemingly contradict the principles of natural selection, such as altruism, can develop. Sociobiology: A New Synthesis, Wilson's first attempt to outline the new field of study, was first published in 1975 and called for a fairly revolutionary update to the so-called Modern Synthesis of evolutionary biology. Sociobiology as a new field of study demanded the active inclusion of sociology, the social sciences, and the humanities in evolutionary theory. Often criticized for its apparent message of "biological destiny," Sociobiology set the stage for such controversial works as Richard Dawkins's The Selfish Gene and Wilson's own Consilience.

Sociobiology defines such concepts as society, individual, population, communication, and regulation. It attempts to explain, biologically, why groups of animals behave the way they do when finding food or shelter, confronting enemies, or getting along with one another. Wilson seeks to explain how group selection, altruism, hierarchies, and sexual selection work in populations of animals, and to identify evolutionary trends and sociobiological characteristics of all animal groups, up to and including man. The insect sections of the books are particularly interesting, given Wilson's status as the world's most famous entomologist.

It is fair to say that as an ecological strategy eusociality has been overwhelmingly successful. It is useful to think of an insect colony as a diffuse organism, weighing anywhere from less than a gram to as much as a kilogram and possessing from about a hundred to a million or more tiny mouths.

It's when Wilson starts talking about human beings that the furor starts. Feminists have been among the strongest critics of the work, arguing that humans are not slaves to a biological destiny, forever locked in "primitive" behavior patterns without the ability to reason past our biochemical nature. Like The Origin of Species, Sociobiology has forced many biologists and social scientists to reassess their most cherished notions of how animals work. --Therese Littleton

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:12 -0400)

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