HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Russia's Foreign Policy: Change and…
Loading...

Russia's Foreign Policy: Change and Continuity in National Identity

by Andrei P. Tsygankov

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
20None515,329 (2)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
Tsygankov's depiction, in clear prose, of the nuances of foreign policy debates in Moscow, and how Western behavior has affected them, will be useful to a broader audience of policy makers, scholars, and students. His policy recommendations to both Russian and Western foreign policy makers are highly sensible.
added by mnkatz | editNationalities Papers, March 2007, Mark N. Katz (Jul 20, 2009)
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 074252650X, Paperback)

This clear and comprehensive text explores the past quarter-century of Soviet/Russian international relations, comparing foreign policy formation under Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and Putin. Challenging conventional views of Moscow's foreign policy, Andrei Tsygankov takes a constructivist approach to argue that definitions of national interest depend on visions of national identity and that national identity is rooted both in history and domestic politics. Yet the author also highlights the role of the external environment in affecting the balance of power among competing domestic groups. Drawing on an impressive mastery of both Russian and Western sources, Andrei P. Tsygankov shows how Moscow's policies have shifted under different leaders' visions of Russia's national interests. He gives an overview of the ideas and pressures that motivated Russian foreign policy in four different periods: the Gorbachev era of the late 1980s, the liberal 'Westernizers' era under Kozyrev in the early 1990s, the relatively hardline statist policy under Primakov, and the more pragmatic statist policy under Putin. Evaluating the successes and failures of Russia's foreign policies, Tsygankov explains its many turns as Russia's identity and interaction with the West have evolved. Instructor Manual (passcoded)

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:28 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Now fully updated and revised, this clear and comprehensive text explores the past quarter-century of Soviet/Russian international relations, comparing foreign policy formation under Gorbachev, Yeltsin, Putin, and Medvedev. Challenging conventional views of Moscow┐?┐s foreign policy, Andrei P. Tsygankov shows that definitions of national interest depend on visions of national identity and is rooted both in history and domestic politics. Yet the author also highlights the role of the external environment in affecting the balance of power among competing domestic groups. Drawing on both Russian and Western sources, Tsygankov shows how Moscow┐?┐s policies have shifted under different leaders┐?┐ visions of Russia┐?┐s national interests. He gives an overview of the ideas and pressures that motivated Russian foreign policy in six different periods: the Gorbachev era of the late 1980s, the liberal ┐?┐Westernizers┐?┐ era under Kozyrev in the early 1990s, the relatively hardline statist policy under Primakov, the more pragmatic statist course under Putin, the assertive policy of the late Putin era, and the return to pragmatic cooperation under Medvedev. Evaluating the successes and failures of Russia┐?┐s foreign policies, Tsygankov explains its many turns as Russia┐?┐s identity and interaction with the West have evolved. The book concludes with reflections on the emergence of the post-Western world and the challenges it presents to Russia┐?┐s enduring quest for great-power status along with its desire for a special relationship with Western nations.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (2)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 124,930,661 books! | Top bar: Always visible