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Pedro Páramo (1955)

by Juan Rulfo

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,553614,314 (4.01)102
As one enters Juan Rulfo's legendary novel, one follows a dusty road to a town of death.Time shifts from one consciousness to another in a hypnotic flow of dreams, desires, and memories, a world of ghosts dominated by the figure of Pedro P'ramo - lover, overlord, murderer. Rulfo's extraordinary mix of sensory images, violent passions and unfathomable mysteries has been a profound influence on a whole generation of Latin American writers including Carlos Fuentes, Mario Vargas Llosa and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. To read Pedro P'ramo today is as overwhelming an experience as when it was first published in Mexico nearly fifty years ago.… (more)
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» See also 102 mentions

English (47)  Spanish (10)  Catalan (2)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (61)
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
I'm not really a big fan of magical realism, and in general I don't like the Latin American literature that is heavily steeped in it. So I started this iconic novel with some skepticism. The Mexican Juan Rulfo published it in 1955, and it is generally seen as the real start of Latin American literature. The novel begins fairly conventionally, with the story of a young man who travels to the village of his presumed father, Pedro Paramo. But what follows is a succession of strange, hallucinatory scenes, with shadowy characters in what appears to be a ghost town, a village where time and space intertwine, and death is omnipresent. Primal father Pedro Parama is about the only connecting element, a mafia figure who rules over life and death without much scruple, but who appears to have a touching soft spot for a woman who has been living in seclusion in the dark for years. In other words, this novel is a very disorienting reading experience, intriguing and frustrating at the same time. The only recent point of comparison seems to me to be 'Lincoln in the Bardo', by George Saunders (2017). But in comparison, Rulfo certainly places more tragic, existential, accents. ( )
  bookomaniac | Jul 25, 2021 |
  chrisvia | Apr 29, 2021 |
Uma intrincada costura de narrativas que misturam história, fantasmas, múltiplos narradores e uma cidade-purgatório, culminando em mais um livro de realismo mágico tão característico da literatura latino-americana.
( )
  XavierPinho | Mar 10, 2021 |
I'm sure there's some kind of allegory here that I'm missing.... ( )
  stravinsky | Dec 28, 2020 |
Read in German. Very atmospheric. Lots of people/ ghosts. Who is alive and who is dead is secondary. ( )
  kakadoo202 | Dec 17, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rulfo, Juanprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
García Márquez, GabrielForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kemp, LysanderTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lechner, J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Peden, Margaret SayersTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sabarte Belacortu, MarioleinContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sontag, SusanForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tzenkova, EmiliyaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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I came to Comala because I had been told that my father, a man named Pedro Páramo, lived there.
Vine a Comala porque me dijeron que acá vivía mi padre, un tal Pedro Páramo.
Quotations
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Chaque soupir est un souffle de vie dont on se défait.
Moi, je ne crois qu'à l'enfer
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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As one enters Juan Rulfo's legendary novel, one follows a dusty road to a town of death.Time shifts from one consciousness to another in a hypnotic flow of dreams, desires, and memories, a world of ghosts dominated by the figure of Pedro P'ramo - lover, overlord, murderer. Rulfo's extraordinary mix of sensory images, violent passions and unfathomable mysteries has been a profound influence on a whole generation of Latin American writers including Carlos Fuentes, Mario Vargas Llosa and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. To read Pedro P'ramo today is as overwhelming an experience as when it was first published in Mexico nearly fifty years ago.

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