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Confession of Faith in a Mennonite Perspective

by Herald Press

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1754125,605 (2.83)None
Adopted by the General Conference Mennonite Church and the Mennonite Church at Wichita, Kansas, July 1995. The 24 articles and summary statement were accepted by both groups as their statement of faith for teaching and nurture in the life of the church.
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Showing 4 of 4
1995 Confession of Faith.
  m.heritagemuseum | Aug 8, 2019 |
I had to read this 92 page confession of faith in order to complete my application to Swamp Mennonite Church, however, as I read it I became increasingly glad that I had to do so. There is something refreshing in the emphasis upon Jesus' teachings on wholeness and reconciliation that permeates this confession of faith. At times I think the Mennonite Church lacks an emphasis on certain areas of the Christian Life, such as evangelism and discipleship, however this confession has a good balance between these tenets of the Christian faith as well as the need for social action and right relationships with the church as well as the world. I would recommend that anyone read this to gain a different perspective on the Bible, the life of the Church, and the mission of every believer.
  NGood | Feb 19, 2014 |
[from back cover] How do confessions of faith serve the church? They: provide guidelines for the interpretation of Scripture; supply guidance for Christian belief and practice; build a foundation for unity within and among Mennonite and other churches; offer an outline for instructing new believers and for sharing information with seekers and inquirers; anchor Christian belief and practice in changing times; and aid in sharing Mennonite belief and practice with other Christians, members of other faiths, as well as with people of no faith.
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  UnivMenno | Nov 15, 2009 |
Perhaps I should preface my score by saying that I am, in fact, Mennonite--of the more scholastic and less conservative slant. While I, obviously, side with several of the definitive Anabaptist dogmatics announced within this little tract, my score does not actually reflect this agreement.

Truth be told, I probably never would have read it if I wasn't so fascinated with Anabaptism in the first place. And once I did read it, well, it was quite dry and bland. It really doesn't give any type of foundation in evidence and argument for its statements. And unlike almost everything else Anabaptist, it really isn't concerned with historical analysis. It declares the perspective of tradition well...but that's really all it does. If that's all you're interested in, great. But for all us Mennonites that have more interest in doing something to bring the kingdom of YHWH into our present social, political, economic, and religious realities...spending time reading through a grocery list of theological beliefs is rather...well...pathetic. You want to know what I as a Mennonite stand for? Watch me march against the war, feed the hungry, fight for social justice, give love in return for hate, pledge allegiance to YHWH beyond all national ties, and give of whatever I have to anyone in my community in need or want. Or read this book. ( )
  slaveofOne | Sep 10, 2007 |
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Adopted by the General Conference Mennonite Church and the Mennonite Church at Wichita, Kansas, July 1995. The 24 articles and summary statement were accepted by both groups as their statement of faith for teaching and nurture in the life of the church.

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