HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

A Woman's Story (1988)

by Annie Ernaux

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
256789,311 (3.93)7
A Woman's Story is Annie Ernaux's "deeply affecting account of mothers and daughters, youth and age, and dreams and reality" (Kirkus Reviews). Upon her mother's death from Alzheimer's, Ernaux embarks on a daunting journey back through time, as she seeks to "capture the real woman, the one who existed independently from me, born on the outskirts of a small Normandy town, and who died in the geriatric ward of a hospital in the suburbs of Paris." She explores the bond between mother and daughter, tenuous and unshakable at once, the alienating worlds that separate them, and the inescapable truth that we must lose the ones we love. In this quietly powerful tribute, Ernaux attempts to do her mother the greatest justice she can: to portray her as the individual she was. She writes, "I believe I am writing about my mother because it is my turn to bring her into the world."… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 7 mentions

English (3)  French (2)  Spanish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (7)
Showing 3 of 3
Annie Ernaux takes no prisoners. All of her books are connected, and all of them quite good. ( )
  MSarki | Jan 23, 2016 |
From Have mother, will travel
  RealLifeReading | Jan 19, 2016 |
Travail autobiographique. Livre très touchant. Ernaux à son meilleur. ( )
  Joe56 | May 19, 2015 |
Showing 3 of 3
"A Woman's Story," which has been effectively translated by Tanya Leslie, offers a selective memoir of a mother's incremental deterioration due to Alzheimer's disease and her subsequent death. Though from the outset we are told dates and places -- the mother dies on April 7 in a nursing home in the Parisian suburb of Pontoise -- and reality elsewhere intrudes in footnotes for newspaper citations, we are spared proper names. Even the ghosts of a once-large farming family remain anonymous, though we learn that attrition caused by alcoholism and other afflictions left few witnesses at this woman's grave. Among them, however, is the stricken narrator, who decides that a life distilled to an inventory of belongings assembled in a plastic bag, courtesy of the nursing home, must, through a form of fiction, be brought back.
 

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Annie Ernauxprimary authorall editionscalculated
Leslie, TanyaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
It is said that contradiction is unthinkable; but the fact is that in the pain of a living being it is even an actual existence. --Hegel
Dedication
First words
My mother died on Monday 7 April in the old people's home attached to the hospital at Pontoise, where I had installed her two years previously. The nurse said over the phone, "Your mother passed away this morning, after breakfast." It was around ten o'clock.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

A Woman's Story is Annie Ernaux's "deeply affecting account of mothers and daughters, youth and age, and dreams and reality" (Kirkus Reviews). Upon her mother's death from Alzheimer's, Ernaux embarks on a daunting journey back through time, as she seeks to "capture the real woman, the one who existed independently from me, born on the outskirts of a small Normandy town, and who died in the geriatric ward of a hospital in the suburbs of Paris." She explores the bond between mother and daughter, tenuous and unshakable at once, the alienating worlds that separate them, and the inescapable truth that we must lose the ones we love. In this quietly powerful tribute, Ernaux attempts to do her mother the greatest justice she can: to portray her as the individual she was. She writes, "I believe I am writing about my mother because it is my turn to bring her into the world."

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.93)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 6
3.5 3
4 20
4.5 4
5 6

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 177,069,422 books! | Top bar: Always visible