HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Saltwater Buddha: A Surfer's Quest to…
Loading...

Saltwater Buddha: A Surfer's Quest to Find Zen on the Sea (original 2009; edition 2009)

by Jaimal Yogis (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
783234,278 (3.56)2
Fed up with suburban teenage life, Jaimal Yogis ran off to Hawaii with little more than a copy of Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha and enough cash for a surfboard. His journey is a coming-of-age saga that takes him from communes to monasteries and the icy New York shore. Equal parts spiritual memoir and surfer's tale, this is a chronicle of finding meditative focus in the barrel of a wave and eternal truth in the great salty blue.… (more)
Member:dogearedpage
Title:Saltwater Buddha: A Surfer's Quest to Find Zen on the Sea
Authors:Jaimal Yogis (Author)
Info:Wisdom Publications (2009), 256 pages
Collections:Audio, Your library
Rating:***
Tags:spoiled kid runs away, surfs

Work details

Saltwater Buddha: A Surfer's Quest to Find Zen on the Sea by Jaimal Yogis (2009)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
A high school age Jaimal runs away from home to Hawaii to surf. Leaves a note for him mom: “I'm somewhere in the world, and I'll call you when I get there.” A wonderful coming-of-age memoir, touching on surfing, hawaii, and Buddhism. You'll come away from the book re-committed to living in the moment and surfing whatever wave, water or otherwise, you're riding. ( )
  viking2917 | Nov 14, 2016 |
The Saltwater Buddha is a high school kid's response to growing up in suburban California the son of divorced parents, longing for independence, spirituality and good surfing. How to find it? Steal some money from your mom (yes, he paid it back) and hop on a flight to Hawaii! After that, it is all ups and downs as you might expect. The book is a lovely memoir that describes the Buddhist perspective on self and how to find it in the middle of water, surfing the big ones. Funny, honest, warm and human, this book does not disappoint. ( )
  krazy4katz | Dec 25, 2013 |
I've never been a surfer but have always had a love for the ocean. Combine that with my new found discovery of meditation and Jaimal Yogis book seemed to be the perfect summer read. Saltwater Buddha is much more than just a love letter to surfing or an examination of Zen it captures the eternal struggle we all have to find our bliss and how we manage to find ways to get in the way of it. Written in an extremely readable style that flows though out the book Saltwater Buddha is the kind of book you won't want rush your way through. The end came all too quickly for me when I read it and I plan on revisiting the book again sometime soon.

However your journey got you to this book, odds are the next step is to read it. It's a beautiful and exceptional book, one that deserves all the accolades it receives. ( )
  gkleinman | Aug 3, 2009 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
The ocean is in constant flux, and when you spend a lot of time in it you become like a floating bottle with a message inside; you know you're going somewhere, sense you have a purpose, but you also know you're at the mercy of the winds and the currents, that surrendering may be your only good option.
Quotations
I've learned that I'm not the things I do or don't do; I'm not surfing or Buddhism or writing. And yet all those things are. And I am. And we have naturally run into each other like colliding atoms creating molecules as we sail on into the foggy mystery. As an ancient Zen master said, "Elements of the Self come and go like clouds without purpose." And it all goes more smoothly, I've come to see, if you just let those clouds come and go freely—accept yourself, accept this.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Fed up with suburban teenage life, Jaimal Yogis ran off to Hawaii with little more than a copy of Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha and enough cash for a surfboard. His journey is a coming-of-age saga that takes him from communes to monasteries and the icy New York shore. Equal parts spiritual memoir and surfer's tale, this is a chronicle of finding meditative focus in the barrel of a wave and eternal truth in the great salty blue.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.56)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 8
3.5 1
4 3
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,086,511 books! | Top bar: Always visible