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Anthem by Ayn Rand
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Anthem (edition 1996)

by Ayn Rand (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,465192614 (3.58)193
Equality 7-2521 lives in the Dark Ages of the future, where all decisions are made by committee, all people live in collectives, all traces of individualism have been wiped out. But the spark of individual thought and freedom still burns in Equality 7-2521, a passion which he has been taught to call sinful. In a purely egalitarian world, he dares to stand forth from the herd -- to think and choose for himself, to discover electricity, and to love the woman of his choice. Now he has been marked for death for committing the ultimate sin: in a world where the great "we" reign supreme, he has rediscovered the lost and holy word "I". This provocative book is an anthem sung in praise of man's ego.… (more)
Member:Zerpified
Title:Anthem
Authors:Ayn Rand (Author)
Info:Signet (1996), 253 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work Information

Anthem by Ayn Rand

  1. 113
    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (MMSequeira)
    MMSequeira: Both 1984 and Anthem we're inspired by Zamyatin's We. Both are worth reading, as cautionary tales.
  2. 83
    We: A Novel by Yevgeny Zamyatin (myshelves)
    myshelves: Classic dystopian novel.
  3. 40
    Essays on Ayn Rand's Anthem by Robert Mayhew (mcaution)
    mcaution: Gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of Rand's novella through this unique collection of scholarly criticism.
  4. 10
    Progress by Charles Stampul (Anonymous user)
  5. 54
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (coolsnak3)
    coolsnak3: more dystopia for you. :)
  6. 11
    Uglies by Scott Westerfeld (TaylorReynolds)
  7. 12
    The Giver by Lois Lowry (kxlly)
  8. 34
    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (Unionhawk)
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» See also 193 mentions

English (189)  German (1)  All languages (190)
Showing 1-5 of 189 (next | show all)
Highly recommended! It's an easy read, and gives excellent insight into Libertarian thinking. Libertarians are a bit too aggressively anti-religion for my tastes, but I respect them as close cousins in liberty. ( )
  dksmiffs | Jan 28, 2022 |
"Our name is Equality 7-2521..."

yeah, try saying that over and over again....it's not pleasant, and neither was this short---but really long---read. ( )
  ennuiprayer | Jan 14, 2022 |


( )
  reneeg | Dec 25, 2021 |
This was a strange, powerful read. Ayn Rand's philosophy of the "I" is most evident in this simple yet stimulating novella.

She depicts a society where there is absolutely no individualism to speak of; it's also a society where men work for other men and all technology/progress is controlled. It's a nightmarish world which I wouldn't ever wish upon my worst enemies.

She writes about the human spirit, individuality, and free will. While her philosophy of the "I" and the "ego" are more prominent in her later books, I feel that this short novella is an excellent sample of her ideas.

I'd love to recommend this book to everyone. Even if you're an ardent supporter of collectivism, socialism, or whatever similar -ism(s) there may be, I feel this is something you need to read. ( )
  bdgamer | Sep 10, 2021 |
Review of eBook

In a dark world ruled by the World Council, there are no individuals, no choices, no options. The Council of Vocations decides what work each one will do; it has been so since the Great Rebirth following the Unmentionable Times. There is no longer the individual, only the collective.

But the restrictions cannot stop Equality 7-2521 from being curious, from wondering. And although he realizes that, according to the teachings, such ideas are evil, he cannot stop himself. What will happen as Equality 7-2521 rebels against the “We” and discovers the long-lost “I” that belongs to every person?

This narrative serves as a sort of prophecy, an observation on the loss of the individual to the machinations of the powerful [that is, “the state”]. It’s an ode to individualism, to freedom, to choice. It’s quite heavy-handed on the hypocrisy of the leadership [that is, those wielding the power] and the inequitable treatment of the populace destined to follow orders without question. The glorification of individualism, of owing nothing to any other continually jumps out at the reader.

While it is true that each individual has moral worth and deserves both freedom and independence, the true answer to the conundrum would seem to lie somewhere midway between individualism and collectivism. However, “Anthem” is worth reading as a reminder that when we forget to value each person, something important is lost.

Recommended. ( )
  jfe16 | Jul 22, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 189 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ayn Randprimary authorall editionscalculated
Peikoff, Leonardsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Peikoff, LeonardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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First words
It is a sin to write this. It is a sin to think words no others think and to put them down upon a paper no others are to see. It is base and evil. It is as if we were speaking alone to no ears but our own. And we know well that there is no transgression blacker than to do or think alone. We have broken the laws. The laws say that men may not write unless the Council of Vocations bid them so. May we be forgiven!
Quotations
This, my body and spirit, this is the end of the quest.
Rather would we be damned with you than blessed with all our brothers.
The fortunes of my spirit are not to be made into coins of brass and be flung into the wind as alms for the poor of spirit.
I understood that centuries of chains and lashes will not kill the spirit of man nor the sense of truth within him.
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Equality 7-2521 lives in the Dark Ages of the future, where all decisions are made by committee, all people live in collectives, all traces of individualism have been wiped out. But the spark of individual thought and freedom still burns in Equality 7-2521, a passion which he has been taught to call sinful. In a purely egalitarian world, he dares to stand forth from the herd -- to think and choose for himself, to discover electricity, and to love the woman of his choice. Now he has been marked for death for committing the ultimate sin: in a world where the great "we" reign supreme, he has rediscovered the lost and holy word "I". This provocative book is an anthem sung in praise of man's ego.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0451191137, 0141189614

HighBridge Audio

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge Audio.

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HighBridge

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge.

» Publisher information page

 

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