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Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer
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Eating Animals (original 2009; edition 2009)

by Jonathan Safran Foer

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3,6241393,435 (4.04)59
From the Publisher: Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his teenage and college years oscillating between omnivore and vegetarian. But on the brink of fatherhood-facing the prospect of having to make dietary choices on a child's behalf-his casual questioning took on an urgency His quest for answers ultimately required him to visit factory farms in the middle of the night, dissect the emotional ingredients of meals from his childhood, and probe some of his most primal instincts about right and wrong. Brilliantly synthesizing philosophy, literature, science, memoir and his own detective work, Eating Animals explores the many fictions we use to justify our eating habits-from folklore to pop culture to family traditions and national myth-and how such tales can lull us into a brutal forgetting. Marked by Foer's profound moral ferocity and unvarying generosity, as well as the vibrant style and creativity that made his previous books, Everything is Illuminated and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, widely loved, Eating Animals is a celebration and a reckoning, a story about the stories we've told-and the stories we now need to tell.… (more)
Member:bren
Title:Eating Animals
Authors:Jonathan Safran Foer
Info:Little, Brown and Company (2009), Hardcover, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:sustainability, food

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Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer (2009)

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» See also 59 mentions

English (122)  Dutch (7)  German (4)  Finnish (2)  French (1)  Catalan (1)  Spanish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (139)
Showing 1-5 of 122 (next | show all)
A good way to become vegetarian - the problem with the book is Foer does not work out the global market mechanics that connect to esting meat.

I wish he had dedicated even half the book to show the way ahead and take into account global forces. ( )
  yates9 | Feb 28, 2024 |
Mr Foer makes a pretty good case for not eating animals. And he does it without being preachy. Instead he uses his own investigative journey through factory farming, first person narratives and interviews, and facts. Lots of numbers. Which is convincing for readers like me to come to our own conclusions and what we should do next. ( )
  mimo | Dec 18, 2023 |
Two years ago, Eating Animals made me vegan. For a while. Foer's unaggressive narrative captured my attention at first, when the book opened questioning the necessity meat-related taboos. Foer seemed to leave me with a freedom to make my own choices, once I was provided the information in his book. As I got through the pages of this book, I became increasingly grossed out with animals products, however. This, surely, resulted from his descriptions of animal suffering, but augmented with the philosophical and economic context of it.

Foer's personal research (I think he traveled to industrial production facilities to check out food production in person) was particularly vivid. One phrase I still remember, two years after reading it: "Although one can realistically expect that at least some percentage of cows and pigs are slaughtered with speed and care, no fish gets a good death. Not a single one. You never have to wonder if the fish on your plate had to suffer. It did."

Now, two years removed from reading this life-changing book, my perception of eating animal products is still morphing. Suffering isn't the biggest question I struggle with these days, but, rather, whether or not I can reduce my contribution to the economy's demand for industrial animal production.

This book won't scream at you in an effort to "convert" you to the vegan church. I encourage any thinking individual to pick this up for a quick dip into reality. ( )
  iothemoon | Sep 27, 2023 |
A truly disturbing read. I've gone through some vegetarian stages throughout my life and after reading this book I'd feel wrong if I didn't make another attempt to embrace a vegetarian diet. A book that should be read by everyone. ( )
  kevinkevbo | Jul 14, 2023 |
I may become vegetarian having read this. Really. Perhaps the book's most powerful statement is this: "It's always possible to wake someone from sleep, but no amount of noise will wake someone who is pretending to be asleep." In other words, once we know what happens on factory farms, not changing our eating habits is nothing but feigned ignorance, a willful refusal to acknowledge the problem. ( )
  sashathewild | Jul 2, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 122 (next | show all)
Animal rights advocates occasionally pick fights with sustainable meat producers (such as Joel Salatin), as Jonathan Safran Foer does in his recent vegetarian polemic, Eating Animals.
 
"A straightforward case for vegetarianism is worth writing," writes Foer, "but it's not what I've written here." Yet he has, though the implications of what eating animals really entails will be hard for most readers to swallow.
 
An earnest if clumsy chronicle of the author’s own evolving thinking about animals and vegetarianism, this uneven volume meanders all over the place, mixing reportage and research with stream-of-consciousness musings and asides.
 
"Eating Animals” is a postmodern version of Peter Singer’s 1975 manifesto “Animal Liberation,” dressed up with narrative bells and whistles befitting the author of “Everything Is Illuminated” and “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.”
 
What makes Eating Animals so unusual is vegetarian Foer's empathy for human meat eaters, his willingness to let both factory farmers and food reform activists speak for themselves, and his talent for using humor to sweeten a sour argument.
 

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jonathan Safran Foerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Berton, GillesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Biersma, OttoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bogdan, IsabelÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Clarinard, RaymondTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Herzke, IngoÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jakobeit, BrigitteÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ross, Jonathan ToddNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Voorhoeve, OnnoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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for Sam and Eleanor, trusty compasses
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When I was young, I would often spend the weekend at my grandmother's house.
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"... A farmer, a Russian, God bless him, he saw my condition, and he went into his house and came out with a piece of meat for me." "He saved your life." "I didn't eat it." "You didn't eat it?" "It was pork. I wouldn't eat pork." "Why?" "What do you mean why?" "What, because it wasn't kosher?" "Of course." "But not even to save your life?" "If nothing matters, there's nothing to save."[pp. 16-17]
The entire, complex saga of Agriprocessors ... by the Orthodox blog FailedMesiah.com [p. 287 as a note for p. 69]
See FarmForward.com for details on how to find non-factory-farmed animal products. [p. 310 as a note for p. 172]
Sholom Mordechai Rubashkin, "Rubashkin's response to the 'attack on Schechita,"" shmais.com, December 7, 2004, http://www.shmais.com/jnewdetail.cfm?... (accessed November 28, 2007). [p. 325 as a note for p. 230]
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From the Publisher: Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his teenage and college years oscillating between omnivore and vegetarian. But on the brink of fatherhood-facing the prospect of having to make dietary choices on a child's behalf-his casual questioning took on an urgency His quest for answers ultimately required him to visit factory farms in the middle of the night, dissect the emotional ingredients of meals from his childhood, and probe some of his most primal instincts about right and wrong. Brilliantly synthesizing philosophy, literature, science, memoir and his own detective work, Eating Animals explores the many fictions we use to justify our eating habits-from folklore to pop culture to family traditions and national myth-and how such tales can lull us into a brutal forgetting. Marked by Foer's profound moral ferocity and unvarying generosity, as well as the vibrant style and creativity that made his previous books, Everything is Illuminated and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, widely loved, Eating Animals is a celebration and a reckoning, a story about the stories we've told-and the stories we now need to tell.

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Hachette Book Group

2 editions of this book were published by Hachette Book Group.

Editions: 0316069906, 0316069884

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An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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