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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by…
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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (original 1968; edition 1975)

by Philip K. Dick, Roger Zelazny (Introduction)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
13,834363251 (3.96)2 / 628
Member:TheCriticalTimes
Title:Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Authors:Philip K. Dick
Other authors:Roger Zelazny (Introduction)
Info:Ballantine Books (1975), Hardcover, 244 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work details

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (1968)

1960s (247)
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English (342)  French (5)  Italian (4)  Spanish (4)  Swedish (2)  Polish (1)  Portuguese (1)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  Romanian (1)  All languages (362)
Showing 1-5 of 342 (next | show all)
For the fact that this story was written fifty years ago, it comes in these days very close in certain areas. We already have such 'robots' that should make our lives easier. What is frightening about this thing is that this 'artificial intelligence' can easily become independent and then we would soon be in the thick of Dick's story. I find it all very frightening and far from calm. ( )
  Ameise1 | Sep 23, 2018 |
I absolutely loved this book! It kept me flipping through the pages as quickly as I could, and it also made me stop and think about things afterward. If you like the movie, you will more than likely like this book. I personally felt that overall, the movie kept fairly close with the book. ( )
  Borrows-N-Wants | Sep 22, 2018 |
Lovely dismal atmosphere, charmingly imperfect characters, but just not enough. It didn’t raise enough doubt for me. It didn’t stir my spirit enough. I guess it’s just because I don’t find it important to ask “What makes us human?” Why should we care about who/what is human/not? What makes humans so elite? It’s because we think we rule the world, when really we only have the ILLUSION of control. (/rant) But I guess the book leading me to this observation is just as important. ( )
  rnmdfrd | Sep 19, 2018 |
This is a strange science fiction novel. Some themes are common with other stories such as a post nuclear war environment, space colonization, mood control by devices, and android technology. The interesting aspects of this story involve bounty hunting of criminal androids, status symbol of owning animals, and a religion that involves a mental connection with a charlatan leader. The story questions how life forms and particularly human differ from artificial intelligence. This is a similar question asked about Data in Star Trek the Next Generation. I am not quite sure what to make of the book. ( )
  GlennBell | Sep 1, 2018 |
Definitely the kind of scifi that I like. Real, easy to read. Also, sheep. ( )
  _rixx_ | Aug 30, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 342 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (58 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dick, Philip K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allié, ManfredTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dougoud, JacquelineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duranti, RiccardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frasca, GabrieleFsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giancola, DonatoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goodfellow, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michniewicz, SueCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pagetti, CarloPsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sleight, GrahamIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Struzen, DrewCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wölfl, NorbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zelazny, RogerIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
And still I dream he treads the lawn,
walking ghostly in the dew,
pierced by my glad singing through.
~ Yeats
Dedication
To Tim and Serena Powers, my dearest friends
To Maren Augusta Bergrud
August 10, 1923 - June 14, 1967
First words
A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
In 1968, Philip K. Dick wrote Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, a brilliant sf novel that became the source of the motion picture Blade Runner. Though the novel's characters and backgrounds differ in some respects from those of the film, readers who enjoy the latter will discover an added dimension on encountering the original work. Del Rey Books returned this classic novel to print with a movie tie-in edition titled Blade Runner: (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?).
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
It was January 2021, and Rick Deckard had a license to kill.

Somewhere among the hordes of humans out there, lurked several rogue androids. Deckard's assignment--find them and then... "retire" them.

Trouble was, the androids all looked and acted exactly like humans, and they didn't want to be found!
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345404475, Paperback)

"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."
--John Brunner

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.

By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.

Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in.

Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
--Paul Williams, Rolling Stone

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:14 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . . Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 13 descriptions

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