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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by…
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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (original 1968; edition 1969)

by Philip K. Dick

Series: Blade Runner (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
16,326423240 (3.95)2 / 708
By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep ... They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.… (more)
Member:Rickpress
Title:Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep
Authors:Philip K. Dick
Info:Signet, New York, NY, (1969), Edition: First, Paperback
Collections:Your library
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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (1968)

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English (396)  French (5)  Italian (5)  Spanish (4)  Swedish (3)  German (2)  Dutch (2)  Portuguese (1)  Polish (1)  Danish (1)  Catalan (1)  Romanian (1)  All languages (422)
Showing 1-5 of 396 (next | show all)
Interesting read. I'm still trying to wrap my head around it completely. I am amazed by how modern the writing style and situations seemed - for being written in the 1960's will the space race just coming into being, I'm amazed at Dick's foresight and style being so close to things written today. ( )
  youngheart80 | Jun 15, 2021 |
That was a fun read. I want to watch Blade Runner again to compare the book to the movie. The whole theme of empathy will change how I watch the movie. I think the book was good but there was the question of why androids are so bad. And if they are so bad why keep making them. Yes, I know they serve a purpose in outer space but to keep making them seem more and more human, why? From Nexus 6 to Nexus 7 and beyond why keep going down a road people want to avoid? Other than that I enjoyed it. ( )
  Kurt.Rocourt | Jun 14, 2021 |
paper. publ 1982, read 2017
  18cran | Jun 7, 2021 |
Honestly, this review would have been more towards a four if the last chapter had not veered off into its own star system. I tend to enjoy stories as vehicle to philosophy, and I enjoyed this for the most part. (The actual exposition of plot and environs was pretty dry.) It was interesting to see where Bladerunner diverged from its source. The original did a much better job of presenting the dying world itself, making life more precious for its absence. Also, although I had read the book was anti-robot (in contrast to the movie), it did not seem that way to me. Overall, this was well worth the read.

Reviewed November 2014 ( )
  amyotheramy | May 11, 2021 |
For some reason, I've never been a raving sci-fi fan, though I like its constituent parts: science and fiction. The only literature I can think of that veers close to the territory is Bradbury and Orwell. But--perhaps a trifle overdue--I'm addressing the omission with some staples of the genre. I selected this one to begin my sci-fi education based on my deep appreciation for the film Blade Runner. It should be noted, that this film certainly is not an adaptation of the book; and the Del Ray book cover I have clearly states that this book is "the inspiration" for the movie.

The prose is crisp and the pace is rapid. I read half the book on a flight from Greensboro, NC to New York (~1 hour) and the second half on the return flight (also ~1 hour). I find that, in general, I get a lot more enjoyment out of longer books that spend more time developing characters and ratcheting up the tension of conflicts, neither of which occurs in this book, so while I feel temporarily stimulated I cannot say that the book had a major impact on me. And perhaps it's because of the anachronistic point of reading this 1968 book here in 2016.

I also think my reception was diminished by all the literature and thought I've absorbed outside of sci-fi literature. Being a reader of philosophy, psychology, science, theology, etc., again one would think I would spend more time in the sci-fi genre, for the books certainly seem to be amalgamations of the aforementioned disciplines. And, indeed, PKD's book seems to me more of a thought experiment in response to major debates in cognitive science and philosophy of the mind of his period. The Voight-Kampff test, for example, is certainly an extension of Alan Turning's "Turing test." But, in the end, I feel as if I've encountered all of PKD's imagined scenarios in some form or another in my reading all around the genre.

Where the book still manages to shine, for me, is in its ability to maintain an uneasy atmosphere of uncertainty. Who is human? Who is an andy? To a larger degree than I expected, I'm still left wondered if Rick is in fact an andy! With the concept of false memories and the employment of the Nexus-6 brains in mind, it's tough to know for sure.

It also shines in its perfectly calculated interpolations of philosophical inquiries. "Andys can't will anything. They can't possess anything to will," says Rick Deckard, leaving me to mull over the concepts of possession and will in the context of organic versus artificial life. And the constant references to the element of empathy as a chief determinant between human and android. This latter argument gets its most thorough treatment in the metaphoric projection of the symbiosis between animals and humans. In the end, I do believe that, in its day, this book certainly blew minds, and I regret not having read it earlier in my life, in a time before one AI movie after another had not staked its claim beforehand. The bright side is that the book has done a fine job of compelling me to continue my exploration of the genre. ( )
1 vote chrisvia | Apr 29, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 396 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (35 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dick, Philip K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allié, ManfredTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dougoud, JacquelineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duranti, RiccardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frasca, GabrieleAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giancola, DonatoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goodfellow, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michniewicz, SueCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pagetti, CarloIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sleight, GrahamIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Struzen, DrewCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wölfl, NorbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zelazny, RogerIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
And still I dream he treads the lawn,
walking ghostly in the dew,
pierced by my glad singing through.
~ Yeats
Dedication
To Tim and Serena Powers, my dearest friends
To Maren Augusta Bergrud
August 10, 1923 - June 14, 1967
First words
A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.
Quotations
My schedule for today lists a six-hour self-accusatory depression.
You will be required to do wrong no matter where you go. It is the basic condition of life, to be required to violate your own identity. At some time, every creature which lives must do so. It is the ultimate shadow, the defeat of creation; this is the curse at work, the curse that feeds on all life. Everywhere in the universe
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
In 1968, Philip K. Dick wrote Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, a brilliant sf novel that became the source of the motion picture Blade Runner. Though the novel's characters and backgrounds differ in some respects from those of the film, readers who enjoy the latter will discover an added dimension on encountering the original work. Del Rey Books returned this classic novel to print with a movie tie-in edition titled Blade Runner: (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?).
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By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep ... They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

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