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Choreography Observed by Jack Anderson
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Choreography Observed

by Jack Anderson

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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0877455937, Paperback)

This 1987 book of essays captures some of the clearest, most insightful, least pretentious dance writing around. Culled from Dance Magazine, the New York Times Ballet Review, Dancing Times, and other publications, these essays (originally published as reviews) serve as a guidebook through the world of late 20th-century dance, in form ("Patterns and Spinning Are Only a Part of It"), in trends ("The Rise of the Male Ensemble"), and especially in personalities ("Some Personal Grumbles About Martha Graham"). Jack Anderson does what few dance writers are able to do: in jargon-free language he describes the intellectual content of modern dance, as well as how the body moves through space and how it can communicate emotions beyond the power of speech.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:37 -0400)

For over twenty years Jack Anderson has been writing about dance performances. His essays and reviews have appeared in daily newspapers, specialist monthlies, and critical quarterlies. For the last ten years he has been a dance critic for the New York Times.In Choreography Observed, Jack Anderson has selected writings that focus most directly on choreographers and choreography in order to illuminate the delights and problems of dance and to reveal the nature of this nonverbal but intensely expressive art form.His essays and reviews deal with individual choreographers from Bournonville, Petipa,… (more)

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