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Endurance by Alfred Lansing
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Endurance (original 1959; edition 2015)

by Alfred Lansing (Author)

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4,9901242,161 (4.37)200
Biography & Autobiography. History. Nonfiction. HTML:

This is a new reading of the thrilling account of one of the most astonishing feats of exploration and human courage ever recorded.

In August of 1914, the British ship Endurance set sail for the South Atlantic. In October, 1915, still half a continent away from its intended base, the ship was trapped, then crushed in the ice. For five months, Sir Ernest Shackleton and his men, drifting on ice packs, were castaways in one of the most savage regions of the world.

Lansing describes how the men survived a 1,000-mile voyage in an open boat across the stormiest ocean in the world and an overland trek through forbidding glaciers and mountains. The book recounts a harrowing adventure, but ultimately it is the nobility of these men and their indefatigable will that shines through.

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… (more)
Member:StefanKiebooms
Title:Endurance
Authors:Alfred Lansing (Author)
Info:Basic Books (2015), 357 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work Information

Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing (1959)

  1. 30
    The Ice Master: The Doomed 1913 Voyage of the Karluk by Jennifer Niven (John_Vaughan)
  2. 10
    The Endurance: Shackleton's Legendary Antarctic Expedition by Caroline Alexander (chrisharpe)
  3. 10
    Miracle in the Andes: 72 Days on the Mountain and My Long Trek Home by Nando Parrado (caimanjosh)
    caimanjosh: This book clearly is somewhat different - there's no sea journeying involved - yet the themes of enduring terrible suffering and overcoming incredible hardships to effect a rescue of one's comrades are the same. Both are the most inspiring stories about the human spirit that I've ever read.… (more)
  4. 00
    South: The Endurance Expedition by Ernest Shackleton (chrisharpe)
  5. 00
    Men Against the Sea by Charles Nordhoff (WildMaggie)
  6. 00
    Shackleton's Boat Journey by Frank Worsley (chrisharpe)
    chrisharpe: An account of the same journey by Endurance's Captain Worsley.
  7. 11
    The Odyssey by Homer (BookWallah)
    BookWallah: Odysseus & Shackleton both had travails getting home from their epic voyages. Differences in their stories: The former’s took 17 years, lost all his men, & was told as epic poetry. The latter’s took 16 months, saved all his men, & is told as gripping biography.… (more)
  8. 00
    Trial by Ice: The True Story of Murder and Survival on the 1871 Polaris Expedition by Richard Parry (Pondlife)
    Pondlife: Endurance shows the positive effects of a great leader; trial by ice shows the negative effects of weak leadership.
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» See also 200 mentions

English (118)  Dutch (2)  German (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (123)
Showing 1-5 of 118 (next | show all)
Everything about this story is bananas. They had so many firsts, purely in an effort to survive. I couldn't stop reading when I got to the final section of the book. ( )
  ohheybrian | Dec 29, 2023 |
Truly one of the best books I’ve ever read. A little slow at the beginning but then I couldn’t put it down. ( )
  kevindern | Oct 27, 2023 |
I was a little apprehensive to read a book written 60 years ago about events that happened 100 ago (would the language be boring?) but it was incredible. I heard about it from my husband so even knowing much of what happens and how it ends, it was still amazingly captivating. I remarked to him that if someone had tried writing these events as a fiction book the editor and/or the public would have trashed the book because of how unbelievable it was - but this really happened. Any of this would have been my own personal hell and if I had been a member of this crew I would have moved to the desert and become a vegetarian I think!

I don't read a lot of non-fiction but I really highly recommend this! ( )
  Fatula | Sep 25, 2023 |
Highly recommended by my EWS FACAD. Read this book via audiobook while training for a marathon in Quantico while at EWS. Made training much easier when in comparison with the trials and tribulations of Shackleton and his crew. Incredible read that I highly recommend anyone with any reading interests to enjoy.
  SDWets | Sep 6, 2023 |
I probably would have paid attention in my high school history class if they taught us about Sir Ernest Shackleton and his impressive voyage on the Endurance. This is an unbelievable story, and one that Alfred Lansing tells superbly in his book, Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage.

My interest in Shackleton and the Endurance began with an episode on the television show, Histories Greatest Mysteries. A crew was searching for the lost Endurance and the episode told the harrowing tale of Shackleton and his crew.

I was intrigued by the story and wanted to know more details so I purchased the book, Endurance by Alfred Lansing, through my Audible subscription. I certainly learned a lot from this book. Shackleton, an expedition leader, was determined to reach the South Pole and establish a base on Antarctica’s Weddell Sea Coast. He and his crew of 27 men and 69 dogs set sail on December 5, 1914. They were to be the first to cross the continent.

Their adventure was troublesome with constantly being trapped in pack ice that made their progress extremely slow. On January 18, 1915, the Endurance became permanently stuck in the pack ice. Initially, they waited out the winter weather on the ship. Once the pack ice began damaging the ship, Shackleton and his crew had no choice but to abandon the Endurance. They established a camp on the ice floe, always intending to get to land. Navigating the ever changing ice floes and sailing in their smaller boats, Shackleton and his crew eventually reached Elephant Island, 497 days into their journey.

From there, Shackleton and five other men, set sail again for a whaling station 800 miles away. It took them 16 days. When they finally reached land, the weather had gotten them so far off course, they were on the opposite side of the island from where they intended. Shackleton and two men hiked, sometimes making progress...

I have photos, videos, and additional information that I'm unable to include here. It can all be found on my blog, in the link below.
A Book And A Dog ( )
  NatalieRiley | Sep 4, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 118 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (13 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alfred Lansingprimary authorall editionscalculated
Philbrick, NathanielIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prebble, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Steinel, WilliamCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The order to abandon ship was given at 5 P.M.
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The time for hesitation was past, and Shackleton swung himself over the side. Working furiously, he began to cut steps in the face of the cliff, descending slowly, a foot at a time. A bitter chill had come into the air, and the sun was nearly down. Gradually they were getting lower, but it was maddeningly slow progress. After thirty minutes, the ice-hard surface of the snow grew softer, indicating that the grade was not quite so steep. Shackleton stopped short. He seemed to realize all at once the futility of what he was doing. At the rate they were going it would take hours to make the descent. Furthermore, it was probably too late to turn back. He hacked out a small platform with the adz, then called to the others to come down. There was no need to explain the situation. Speaking rapidly, Shackleton said simply that they faced a clear-cut choice: If they stayed where they were, they would freeze-in an hour, maybe two, maybe more. They had to get lower-and with all possible haste. So he suggested they slide. Worsley and Crean were stunned-especially for such an insane solution to be coming from Shackleton. But he wasn’t joking…he wasn’t even smiling. He meant it-and they knew it. But what if they hit a rock, Crean wanted to know. Could they stay where they were, Shackleton replied, his voice rising. The slope, Worsley argued. What if it didn’t level off? What if there were another precipice? Shackleton’s patience was going. Again he demanded-could they stay where they were? Obviously they could not, and Worsley and Crean reluctantly were forced to admit it. Nor was there really any other way of getting down. And so the decision was made. Shackleton said they would slide as a unit, holding onto one another. They quickly sat down and untied the rope which held them together. Each of them coiled up his share to form a mat. Worsley locked his legs around Shackleton’s waist and put his arms around Shackleton’s neck. Crean did the same with Worsley. They looked like three tobogganers without a toboggan. Altogether it took a little more than a minute, and Shackleton did not permit any time for reflection. When they were ready, he kicked off. In the next instant their hearts stopped beating. They seemed to hang poised for a split second, then suddenly the wind was shrieking in their ears, and a white blur of snow tore past. Down…down…they screamed – not in terror necessarily, but simply because they couldn’t help it. It was squeezed out of them by the rapidly mounting pressure in their ears and against their chests. Faster and faster – down … down …down! Then they shot forward onto the level, and their speed began to slacken. A moment later they came to an abrupt halt in a snowbank. The three men picked themselves up. They were breathless and their hearts were beating wildly. But they found themselves laughing uncontrollably. What had been a terrifying prospect possibly a hundred seconds before had turned into a breath-taking triumph.
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Biography & Autobiography. History. Nonfiction. HTML:

This is a new reading of the thrilling account of one of the most astonishing feats of exploration and human courage ever recorded.

In August of 1914, the British ship Endurance set sail for the South Atlantic. In October, 1915, still half a continent away from its intended base, the ship was trapped, then crushed in the ice. For five months, Sir Ernest Shackleton and his men, drifting on ice packs, were castaways in one of the most savage regions of the world.

Lansing describes how the men survived a 1,000-mile voyage in an open boat across the stormiest ocean in the world and an overland trek through forbidding glaciers and mountains. The book recounts a harrowing adventure, but ultimately it is the nobility of these men and their indefatigable will that shines through.

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