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Passions and moral progress in Greco-Roman thought

by John T. Fitzgerald (Editor)

Other authors: Loveday C.A. Alexander (Contributor), David Armstrong (Contributor), David Charles Aune (Contributor), David E. Aune (Contributor), Troels Engberg-Pedersen (Contributor)8 more, William W. Fortenbaugh (Contributor), Edgar M. Krentz (Contributor), S. Georgia Nugent (Contributor), Johan C. Thom (Contributor), James Ware (Contributor), L. Michael White (Contributor), David Winston (Contributor), Richard A. Wright (Contributor)

Series: Routledge Monographs in Classical Studies (8)

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This book contains a collection of 13 essays from leading scholars on the relationship between passionate emotions and moral advancement in Greek and Roman thought.  Recognising that emotions played a key role in whether individuals lived happily, ancient philosophers extensively discussed the nature of "the passions", showing how those who managed their emotions properly would lead better, more moral lives.  The contributions are preceded by an introdution to the subject by John Fitzgerald.  Writers discussed include the Cynics, the Neopythagorians, Aristotle and Ovid; the discussion encompasses philosophy, literature and religion.… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Fitzgerald, John T.Editorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Alexander, Loveday C.A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Armstrong, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aune, David CharlesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aune, David E.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Engberg-Pedersen, TroelsContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fortenbaugh, William W.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Krentz, Edgar M.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Nugent, S. GeorgiaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Thom, Johan C.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ware, JamesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
White, L. MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Winston, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wright, Richard A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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This book contains a collection of 13 essays from leading scholars on the relationship between passionate emotions and moral advancement in Greek and Roman thought.  Recognising that emotions played a key role in whether individuals lived happily, ancient philosophers extensively discussed the nature of "the passions", showing how those who managed their emotions properly would lead better, more moral lives.  The contributions are preceded by an introdution to the subject by John Fitzgerald.  Writers discussed include the Cynics, the Neopythagorians, Aristotle and Ovid; the discussion encompasses philosophy, literature and religion.

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