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The One Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out…
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The One Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared (2009)

by Jonas Jonasson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The One Hundred Year Old Man (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,7663761,228 (3.67)306
Confined to a nursing home and about to turn 100, Allan Karlsson, who has a larger-than-life back story as an explosives expert, climbs out of the window in his slippers and embarks on an unforgettable adventure involving thugs, a murderous elephant and a very friendly hot dog stand operator.
Recently added bymrslibrarianlady, private library, herriott101, DKRafi, gvau, knizhki, sharonburman, JRP208, ChelsCee
  1. 40
    A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (Iudita)
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    Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen (JenMDB)
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    Forrest Gump by Winston Groom (2810michael)
  4. 20
    Gold by Dan Rhodes (Anonymous user)
  5. 20
    Candide by Voltaire (gennyt)
    gennyt: Both books contain extraordinary, unlikely picaresque adventures combined with humorous satire on the politics, wars and religious issues of their time.
  6. 10
    The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson (Anonymous user)
  7. 10
    Popular Music from Vittula by Mikael Niemi (hilge)
    hilge: Similar Scandinavian characters are found in both books and both will make you laugh.
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    Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson (BookshelfMonstrosity)
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    Norwegian by Night by Derek B. Miller (kristenl)
    kristenl: Both stories are centered around old men, and both contain historical flashbacks.
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    A Fraction of the Whole by Steve Toltz (jayne_charles)
    jayne_charles: More improbable events on an epic scale
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    Exit Lines by Joan Barfoot (Booktrovert)
    Booktrovert: Exit Lines, set in a nursing home, is a thoughtful, honest book about human inter-connectivity and longevity.
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    The Rabbit Back Literature Society by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen (rrmmff2000)
    rrmmff2000: Lighthearted Nordic stories with no particular destination or hurry to get there.
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(see all 22 recommendations)

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» See also 306 mentions

English (286)  Spanish (22)  Dutch (17)  French (15)  German (13)  Catalan (7)  Italian (4)  Norwegian (3)  Finnish (3)  Danish (3)  Swedish (2)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (376)
Showing 1-5 of 286 (next | show all)
It reminds me a lot of Forrest Gump in that we've got a a goofy character who is edited into a ton of 20th-century historical landmarks; he is completely apolitical, loves to blow shit up, and is delightfully devil-may care. His elderly self hasn't changed in the slightest, and so we can continue to see the world through a pair of skewed eyes that are nonetheless quite fun. At first, I thought this might have turned into a modern-day Candide, but the story is still focuses very much on story and has veered away fairly successfully from allegory.

So, after finishing the novel, I can say that it has successfully veered away from any type of overt allegory, may the allegorical heavens be praised. On the other hand, I enjoyed the way that our intrepid hero managed to comment about so many political features of the 20th century by being so apolitical. I personally enjoyed the progress, having read and enjoyed so much history in much the same way the author has. He stayed away from some hot topics of debate and blithely character-dropped the big movers and shakers and it was a blast. I understand there will be a movie? In that case, I certainly hope the cast of actors are up to the job or the CGI gives more than credible performances or else the movie will bomb very hard, otherwise. The novel's strength lies in the reader's nodding at events they've either lived or have a more than passing interest in. Otherwise, the novel becomes a novelette about the zany adventures of craftily created random characters that are so much larger than life precisely because they also have to stand up to real people in the past that did so many great things. (As we are made to believe for our intrepid hero.) If that's the case, then it's a decent enough comedy, but if you're taking the whole novel as a piece, then I'm sure you will be pleasantly surprised by the stroll. ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Allan Karlsson hat Geburtstag. Er wird 100 Jahre alt. Eigentlich ein Grund zu feiern. Doch während sich der Bürgermeister und die lokale Presse auf das große Spektakel vorbereiten, hat der Hundertjährige ganz andere Pläne: er verschwindet einfach – und schon bald steht ganz Schweden wegen seiner Flucht auf dem Kopf. Doch mit solchen Dingen hat Allan seine Erfahrung, er hat schließlich in jungen Jahren die ganze Welt durcheinander gebracht.
  Fredo68 | May 14, 2020 |
A lot of fun. ( )
  Kelmanel | Apr 17, 2020 |
Allan Karlsson has finally made his 100th birthday, and the home he is in are holding a party for him. All the local dignitaries will be there, and the press, but the guest of honour has decided that he doesn't want to be. So with a little trouble and effort, he climbs out of the window and walks away from this life.

At the bus station he is asked to look after a case by a rude young man and decides there and then to take the case with him. The guy appears, and upon finding his case missing goes slightly bananas as he is supposed to guarding this with his life. And it is gone. And so begins the latest adventures of Karlsson, as the police and the owners of the suitcase frantically try and find him and the case, with varying levels of failure and mishap.

There are some really funny parts in this story, and it is a nice light summer read. That said a significant portion of the book is about his life in the past that is full of unlikely coincidences and chance meetings with all manner of famous people. The author does tie it all together neatly in the ending, but it just was a little too much. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
Unusually, I read the sequel first and enjoyed it so much I sought out the first book. Also unusually, I enjoyed the sequel much more than the first book; I might not have even looked for the sequel if I had read the books in order. There were enough flashes of brilliance and dashes of humor to keep me going, and near the very end it picked up and became funnier, and also began to resemble the sequel. So it was good, but not quite as good as I had hoped. ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 286 (next | show all)
Fast-moving and relentlessly sunny, the novel quickly develops into a romp that takes in all the major events of the 20th century. . . the plot is pleasingly nimble and the book's endearing charm offers a happy alternative to the more familiar Nordic noir.
added by mysterymax | editThe Guardian, Jane Housham (Jul 24, 2012)
 
Stalin synger svenske drikkeviser, og Truman blir dritings .Forrest Gump som hundreåring i ny bok.
ANMELDELSE: Han redder general Franco, riktignok etter først å ha plassert en bombe for å drepe ham. Han avverger et attentat mot Churchill, og gir Oppenheimer den endelige løsningen på formelen for atombomben.

Det rene soap altså. Samtidig er det — på sin høyst skakke og fantasifulle måte — en fantastisk reise gjennom forrige århundre.

Jonas Jonassen er intelligent, vittig og systemkritisk, der han harver over alt fra fjollete politifolk, rasehygienikere og despoters ideologiske paranoia. I en bok som gir håp om at alle har en fremtid, også hundreåringer.
added by annek49 | editDagbladet, Cathrine Krøger (Jan 18, 2011)
 
Nästan frustande av alla förvecklingar som ryms i debuten släpper jag snart taget en bit in i läsningen. Jag inser att precis vad som helst kan hända och kommer att göra det. Författaren tycks bubbla av infallsrikedom strösslad med lite sensmoral.
 

» Add other authors (45 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jonas Jonassonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Černík, ZbyněkTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bjørnson, ElisabethTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bradbury, RodTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bree, Corry vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crossley, StevenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kuhn, WibkeÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Podestà Heir, MargheritaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"Things are what they are, and whatever will be will be."
Dedication
Ingen kunde trollbinda sin publik bättre än morfar där han satt på ljugarbänken, lätt framåtlutad över sin käpp och med munnen full av snus.
– Nej men... är det sant, morfar? sa vi häpna barnbarn.
– Di söm bara säjer dä söm ä sanning, ä inte vär' å höra på, svarade morfar.
Den här boken är till honom.
Dedication on first page: Ingen var bedre til at trykkebinde sine tilhørere end morfar, som han sad der på skrønebænken, lænet frem over stokken og med munden fuld af snus."Jamen ... passer det, morfar?" måbede vi børnebørn."Dem, der kuns siger noget, der passer, de er itt' værd å hør' på," svarede morfar.Denne bog er tilegnet ham.Jonas Jonassson
An extra thank you to Micke, Liza, Rixon, Maud and Uncle Hans.
- Jonas
Dedication on last page: En særlig tak til Micke, Lizza, Rixon, Maud og morbror Hans.
First words
Monday, 2nd May 2005

You might think he could have made up his mind earlier, and been man enough to inform his surroundings of his decision. But Allan Karlsson had never been given to pondering things too long.
Man kan mene, at han burde have bestemt sig noget før, og at han burde have været mand for at meddele omgivelserne sin beslutning. Men det havde aldrig ligget til Allan Karlsson at gruble for længe over tingene.Altså nåede tanken kun lige at slå rod i den gamle mands hoved, før han åbnede vinduet til sit værelse i stueetagen på plejehjemmet i Malmköping i Sörmland og kravlede ud i bedet.
Quotations
Allan Karlsson to Prosecutor Ranelid: "You can never have too much clarity."
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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