HomeGroupsTalkExplore
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The pursuit of happiness : discovering the…
Loading...

The pursuit of happiness : discovering the pathway to fulfillment,… (edition 1992)

by David G. Myers

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1041232,341 (3.83)None
Who is happy--and why? With this seemingly simple question, social psychologist David G. Myers launches on a revealing exploration of happiness, a mission that goes beyond defining this elusive emotion to reveal just what we can do to achieve it. Along the way he discovers that happy people have a lot going for them: They are energetic, decisive, creative, social, trusting, loving, and responsive. They tolerate frustration well and are willing to help others. Even their immune systems function better than those of unhappy people. Myers, who reviewed thousands of recent studies conducted worldwide in the course of researching The Pursuit of Happiness, asks (and answers) the important questions about the nature and value of happiness. Is happiness rare? Not as rare as you might think, although the percentage of happy people varies widely from one country to the next. Can money buy happiness? On the contrary, accumulation of wealth and self-focused individualism rarely produce well-being. Happiness depends more on our attitude toward the things we have than on having things. Does age affect happiness? Not necessarily; teens and elderly people report the same levels of happiness as people in the "prime" of their lives. But happy children do make happy adults. Are men happier than women? No; although women are more likely to be depressed than men, they are just as likely to be happy. When it comes to well-being, the sexes are equal. In short, Myers has found that objective life circumstances have little effect on well-being, and that recent discoveries continue to explode some of the popular myths about happiness and its more frequently studied counterpart, the avoidance of misery. He also identifies the four key inner traits that do bring about happiness and tells us how to trigger these traits and measure our own levels of satisfaction. With wit, kindness, and wisdom, Myers shows how we can promote our own happiness: What makes a happy marriage, the value of active spirituality, the importance of attitude, rest, fun, love, faith, hope, friendships, meaningful work, and all the other ingredients that can help us modify our lives to "experience the grace needed to live with integrity, inner peace, and joy."… (more)
Member:Piedmontchurch
Title:The pursuit of happiness : discovering the pathway to fulfillment, well-being, and enduring personal joy
Authors:David G. Myers
Info:New York, NY : Avon Books, 1993, c1992.
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

The Pursuit of Happiness: Discovering the Pathway to Fulfillment, Well-Being, and Enduring Personal Joy by David G. Myers

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

This book asks and answers the important questions about the nature and value of happiness. Is happiness rare? Can money buy happiness? Does age affect happiness? Are men happier than women? This is my favorite quote I found in the book. The essence of happiness is pausing to savor the gift of our present moments.
In a world of multi-tasking happiness may be eluding us more and more. We need to take time over our coffee, tea or soda. We need to focus on eating when eating and realize we are nourishing our bodies. We need to see the beauty in a fresh fallen snow and let the worries about traffic keep for when you have to deal with the traffic. We need to treasure the times that our pets cuddle with us, when a friend takes time to say hello, when a neighbor needs help, when our child takes time to need us.
( )
  Jolene.M | Jul 30, 2020 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Who is happy--and why? With this seemingly simple question, social psychologist David G. Myers launches on a revealing exploration of happiness, a mission that goes beyond defining this elusive emotion to reveal just what we can do to achieve it. Along the way he discovers that happy people have a lot going for them: They are energetic, decisive, creative, social, trusting, loving, and responsive. They tolerate frustration well and are willing to help others. Even their immune systems function better than those of unhappy people. Myers, who reviewed thousands of recent studies conducted worldwide in the course of researching The Pursuit of Happiness, asks (and answers) the important questions about the nature and value of happiness. Is happiness rare? Not as rare as you might think, although the percentage of happy people varies widely from one country to the next. Can money buy happiness? On the contrary, accumulation of wealth and self-focused individualism rarely produce well-being. Happiness depends more on our attitude toward the things we have than on having things. Does age affect happiness? Not necessarily; teens and elderly people report the same levels of happiness as people in the "prime" of their lives. But happy children do make happy adults. Are men happier than women? No; although women are more likely to be depressed than men, they are just as likely to be happy. When it comes to well-being, the sexes are equal. In short, Myers has found that objective life circumstances have little effect on well-being, and that recent discoveries continue to explode some of the popular myths about happiness and its more frequently studied counterpart, the avoidance of misery. He also identifies the four key inner traits that do bring about happiness and tells us how to trigger these traits and measure our own levels of satisfaction. With wit, kindness, and wisdom, Myers shows how we can promote our own happiness: What makes a happy marriage, the value of active spirituality, the importance of attitude, rest, fun, love, faith, hope, friendships, meaningful work, and all the other ingredients that can help us modify our lives to "experience the grace needed to live with integrity, inner peace, and joy."

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.83)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 3
3.5 1
4 6
4.5 1
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 182,815,216 books! | Top bar: Always visible