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1963140,274 (3.82)9
"Ridley Scott's dystopian classic Blade Runner, an adaptation of Philip K. Dick's novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, combines noir with science fiction to create a groundbreaking cyberpunk vision of urban life in the twenty-first century. With replicants on the run, the rain-drenched Los Angeles which Blade Runner imagines is a city of oppression and enclosure, but a city in which transgression and disorder can always erupt. Graced by stunning sets, lighting, effects, costumes and photography, Blade Runner succeeds brilliantly in depicting a world at once uncannily familiar and startlingly new. In his innovative and nuanced reading, Scott Bukatman details the making of Blade Runner and its steadily improving fortunes following its release in 1982. He situates the film in terms of debates about postmodernism, which have informed much of the criticism devoted to it, but argues that its tensions derive also from the quintessentially twentieth-century, modernist experience of the city - as a space both imprisoning and liberating. In his foreword to this special edition, published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the BFI Film Classics series, Bukatman suggests that Blade Runner 's visual complexity allows it to translate successfully to the world of high definition and on-demand home cinema. He looks back to the science fiction tradition of the early 1980s, and on to the key changes in the 'final' version of the film in 2007, which risk diminishing the sense of instability created in the original."--Bloomsbury publishing.… (more)
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I do enjoy the BFI books. This one I originally bought and read for a class called Writing About Film. One of the films we studied in-depth was Blade Runner because it has been so widely written about. Since I just made my way through the 2007 Collector's Edition DVD release, I thought it was time to give this one another read.

Bukatman is very detailed in his research and analysis of Blade Runner, but he tends to meander on occasion. He goes off on tangents regarding all of science fiction and compares Blade Runner to other works such as Things To Come and Metropolis. While there is good reason for these comparisons, it feels like he relies a bit too much on these other films at points.

Still, a decent piece of scholarly writing on a great film, worth reading if you like in-depth critical analysis of films. ( )
  regularguy5mb | Nov 16, 2014 |
In Blade Runner box in attic
  stevholt | Nov 19, 2017 |
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This one is for Dana Polan: scholar, friend, mensch
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'You Nexus, hah?' asks the wizened Asian technician in Eye Works.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Originally appeared in BFI Modern Classics; then in BFI Film Classics
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"Ridley Scott's dystopian classic Blade Runner, an adaptation of Philip K. Dick's novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, combines noir with science fiction to create a groundbreaking cyberpunk vision of urban life in the twenty-first century. With replicants on the run, the rain-drenched Los Angeles which Blade Runner imagines is a city of oppression and enclosure, but a city in which transgression and disorder can always erupt. Graced by stunning sets, lighting, effects, costumes and photography, Blade Runner succeeds brilliantly in depicting a world at once uncannily familiar and startlingly new. In his innovative and nuanced reading, Scott Bukatman details the making of Blade Runner and its steadily improving fortunes following its release in 1982. He situates the film in terms of debates about postmodernism, which have informed much of the criticism devoted to it, but argues that its tensions derive also from the quintessentially twentieth-century, modernist experience of the city - as a space both imprisoning and liberating. In his foreword to this special edition, published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the BFI Film Classics series, Bukatman suggests that Blade Runner 's visual complexity allows it to translate successfully to the world of high definition and on-demand home cinema. He looks back to the science fiction tradition of the early 1980s, and on to the key changes in the 'final' version of the film in 2007, which risk diminishing the sense of instability created in the original."--Bloomsbury publishing.

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