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Inherit the Stars by James Patrick Hogan
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Inherit the Stars (edition 1977)

by James Patrick Hogan

Series: Giants (1)

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8531619,483 (3.79)18
The man on the moon was dead. They called him Charlie. He had big eyes, abundant body hair, and fairly long nostrils. His skeletal body was found clad in a bright red spacesuit, hidden in a rocky grave. They didn't know who he was, how he got there, or what had killed him. All they knew was that his corpse was fifty thousand years old-and that meant this man had somehow lived long before he ever could have existed.… (more)
Member:runesmith
Title:Inherit the Stars
Authors:James Patrick Hogan
Info:Del Rey Books (1992), Mass Market Paperback
Collections:Your library
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Inherit the Stars by James P. Hogan

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» See also 18 mentions

English (14)  Italian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (16)
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
When it was good, it was really pretty good, but when it was bad, it was horrid.

The extreme sexism was so awful it ruined the book for me. I could have put up with the poor characterization and pacing for the sake of the interesting scientific mystery.

One and a half stars. ( )
  VictoriaGaile | Oct 16, 2021 |
This was Hogan's first book, and he started out with a bang.

The writing is somewhat clumsy, the characters are not all that interesting, but the ideas and the story are fascinating. What Hogan does well, here and in other novels, is to take some wild pseudoscientific idea and ask what would happen if it actually were true. This one is in the form of an extremely intriguing mystery. It is well thought ought, plausible given the premise, all the clues are there, but you don't see it until the end. In other words, exactly like a good mystery, though in this case nobody gets shot (at least in the story timeline), nobody is doing anything particularly wrong, but there is a huge mystery nonetheless. ( )
  garyrholt | Nov 5, 2020 |
This is a very nice little novel and quite a bit of change from the military science fiction that I usually read. It’s written back in the 70’s and its age shows a little but surprisingly little. As a computer engineer I couldn’t help but smiling when the book talked about DEC computers in the future. DEC had of course not gone belly-up when this book was written. Also today, with the advancement of DNA-tests, you would never have the lengthy debate and scientific detective work in order to establish the relation to the human species of the body found on the moon.

Apart from that, the scientific (fictional) basis of the book has survived father time quite well. The entire book is more or less one long investigation/research story starting with the discovery of the space suit clad human (as it turns out) body in a cave on the moon. To get such a story as interesting and catching as is the case is quite a feat and this was very catching. The conclusions were, for the most part logical, and the unraveling of the mystery interesting and not too predictable although the mystery that eventually led up to some “astonishing” facts about our moon, that one could deduce the answer to rather quickly and well in advance of the big revelation in the book.

It’s no action story though. It’s a scientific detective story. If you do not like to read about (fairly) long scientific explanations for why this and that theory is or is not valid then you won’t like this book as much as I did. Anyway the conclusion is, obviously, that I found this book a very nice read. If I should complain about something it would be the little epilogue in the ending which, to me, is the classical cheap rubbish that you would but in an equally cheap B-movie. ( )
  perjonsson | Jun 10, 2019 |
Good book.

James Hogan's books are slow moving but interesting. He creates mysteries which slowly unfold for the reader. The characters are realistic but their interaction is often boring. The desire to lean about the true origins of man, the ancient history of the solar system and alien technology keeps you reading.

Good enough that I will read the two follow up books. ( )
  ikeman100 | Jul 29, 2018 |
Old hard scifi. Actually kept my interest even with no fighting, no action and no non-cerebral plot. ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Dec 10, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James P. Hoganprimary authorall editionscalculated
Sweet, Darrell K.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The man on the moon was dead. They called him Charlie. He had big eyes, abundant body hair, and fairly long nostrils. His skeletal body was found clad in a bright red spacesuit, hidden in a rocky grave. They didn't know who he was, how he got there, or what had killed him. All they knew was that his corpse was fifty thousand years old-and that meant this man had somehow lived long before he ever could have existed.

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