HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Totem e Tabu (Em Portugues do Brasil) by…
Loading...

Totem e Tabu (Em Portugues do Brasil) (original 1913; edition 2012)

by Sigmund Freud (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,3721010,642 (3.5)13
In this controversial study Freud applies the theories and evidence of his psychoanalytic investigations to the study of aboriginal peoples and, by extension, to the earliest cultural stages of the human race before the rise of large-scale civilizations. Relying on the reports of ethnographers such as J. G. Frazer, E. B. Tylor, and others, Freud points out the striking parallels between the cultural practices of native tribal groups and the behavior patterns of neurotics. His ultimate aim is to shed light on the psychological factors involved in the development of culture in the same way as he analyzed the unconscious motivations of neurotic individuals. Beginning with a discussion of the incest taboo, which is one of the main features of the totemic tribal structure, he compares the taboo to the infantile stage of individual psychological development, in which the male child experiences incestuous sexual feelings for his mother (and the girl for her father). He draws parallels between some of the elaborate taboo restrictions seen in these early cultures and the scrupulous rituals of compulsion neurotics, who in a similar fashion are wrestling with the ambivalent emotions aroused by the incest taboo. The implication is that many of the ceremonies and rituals of culture develop as a psychological reaction to the incest taboo, which prohibits the acting out of an infantile impulse that would be socially destructive. Freud contends that cultures evolve through three main stages: the animistic, the religious, and the scientific. The earliest stage of animism corresponds to the narcissistic phase of individual development, when the child overvalues the importance and influence of his inner psychic life on the outer world. In the religious stage of culture, humanity realizes that its own conceptions do not have full power to control outer reality and attributes this power to deities, who nonetheless can be manipulated through religious ceremony. This stage of culture corresponds to the individual growth phase of dependence on the parents. The scientific stage is tantamount to the mature phase of individual development, in which the individual recognizes his very limited power to control the universe and accepts the reality of his own death as well as all other natural realities. Freud concludes by invoking his famous Oedipus complex as the key to the development of culture, just as it is the main conflict underlying all neurotic illness in his theory. The repressed psychological urge to kill the father as the rival for the mother's affections is the underlying motive for the symbols and ceremonies of religion with all its many sacrificial rituals of expiation and its notions of angry gods, original sin, and humankind's guilt and need for atonement. Although Freud's theories and life are controversial today, this masterful synthesis and its undeniable influence on later scholars of religion, anthropology, and psychology make it an indispensable work.… (more)
Member:PedroZimerman1
Title:Totem e Tabu (Em Portugues do Brasil)
Authors:Sigmund Freud (Author)
Info:Companhia das Letras (2012)
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

Totem and Taboo by Sigmund Freud (1913)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 13 mentions

English (9)  Spanish (1)  All languages (10)
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
When I saw that the subtitle was “Some Points of Agreement between the Mental Lives of Savages and Neurotics,” I had a pretty good sense that this book was going to be awful. But I wanted to give it a fair shot. On page one of Chapter One (“The Horrors of Incest”), I read, “I shall select as the basis of comparison the tribes which have been described by anthropologists as the most backward and miserable of savages, the aborigines of Australia.” At that point I just gave it up as a lost cause. I flipped through the rest and basically his point is that psychologically people in traditional societies are just like children. I think in general the non-fiction of a century ago is not going to stand up as well as the fiction. I do grant this book the third most porn-y name of all the books of 1913, which seems only right. ( )
  jollyavis | Dec 14, 2021 |
In the beginning was the Deed.

Basically, we collectively killed the dad, felt sorry-not sorry, reenacted the crime over and over until we forgot exactly what we did in the first place, and eventually invented religion to make sense of it all. The end! ( )
2 vote drbrand | Jun 8, 2020 |
Totem and Taboo is an investigation into the links between Neurosis and the religious / social Totem tradition, and the Taboos found in pre and post-totemic societies. In large part this work is inspired by the anthropological work of James George Frazer, with Freud bringing in his interests in the subconscious and the Oedipus complex to explain the genesis of the Totem system of beliefs, and the wide-spread existence of certain taboos.

This use of psychoanalytic thinking to solve some of the puzzles of anthropology seems to be a sensible approach. Though Freud discusses several theories here, some of which are much more convincing than others, we are left without any definite conclusions. Which is only to be expected as this sort of work can only ever be theoretical, peering as it is into the distant mists of time. However it does yield several testable hypotheses which are backed up by anthropological findings, giving some credibility to the ideas being thrown around here.

Probably best appreciated by those who are already familiar with Freud, and Frazer's Golden Bough, however Freud does a fairly good job at explaining to concepts so it would not be too much to pick up from scratch. ( )
1 vote P_S_Patrick | Dec 13, 2019 |
Totem e Tabu é um Freud que vale a pena, acima de tudo um trabalho antropológico, Freud cita logo na introdução que seu estímulo para escrever tal livro foram as obras de Jung e Wundt, perpassando todo o livro com citações da obra de James Frazer, The Golden Bough que nos dá as linhas gerais do nascimento da sociedade patriarcal primitiva, onde o pai primevo gerou uma herança de totens e tabus através de seus filhos revoltados com a onipotência desse pai. ( )
  Adriana_Scarpin | Jun 12, 2018 |
This book provides insight into the thinking of Freud,who is a founder of some progress in clinical psychology. He is logical and well researched. He ultimately ties totemism and religion to the Oedipus complex. I found the work to be of little practical value. I am not thoroughly convinced it is even intellectually correct. ( )
  GlennBell | Aug 22, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (22 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sigmund Freudprimary authorall editionscalculated
Brice, SilvijaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brill, Abraham ATranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eskola, AnttiForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Strachey, JamesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zimmermann, Wolf D.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

In this controversial study Freud applies the theories and evidence of his psychoanalytic investigations to the study of aboriginal peoples and, by extension, to the earliest cultural stages of the human race before the rise of large-scale civilizations. Relying on the reports of ethnographers such as J. G. Frazer, E. B. Tylor, and others, Freud points out the striking parallels between the cultural practices of native tribal groups and the behavior patterns of neurotics. His ultimate aim is to shed light on the psychological factors involved in the development of culture in the same way as he analyzed the unconscious motivations of neurotic individuals. Beginning with a discussion of the incest taboo, which is one of the main features of the totemic tribal structure, he compares the taboo to the infantile stage of individual psychological development, in which the male child experiences incestuous sexual feelings for his mother (and the girl for her father). He draws parallels between some of the elaborate taboo restrictions seen in these early cultures and the scrupulous rituals of compulsion neurotics, who in a similar fashion are wrestling with the ambivalent emotions aroused by the incest taboo. The implication is that many of the ceremonies and rituals of culture develop as a psychological reaction to the incest taboo, which prohibits the acting out of an infantile impulse that would be socially destructive. Freud contends that cultures evolve through three main stages: the animistic, the religious, and the scientific. The earliest stage of animism corresponds to the narcissistic phase of individual development, when the child overvalues the importance and influence of his inner psychic life on the outer world. In the religious stage of culture, humanity realizes that its own conceptions do not have full power to control outer reality and attributes this power to deities, who nonetheless can be manipulated through religious ceremony. This stage of culture corresponds to the individual growth phase of dependence on the parents. The scientific stage is tantamount to the mature phase of individual development, in which the individual recognizes his very limited power to control the universe and accepts the reality of his own death as well as all other natural realities. Freud concludes by invoking his famous Oedipus complex as the key to the development of culture, just as it is the main conflict underlying all neurotic illness in his theory. The repressed psychological urge to kill the father as the rival for the mother's affections is the underlying motive for the symbols and ceremonies of religion with all its many sacrificial rituals of expiation and its notions of angry gods, original sin, and humankind's guilt and need for atonement. Although Freud's theories and life are controversial today, this masterful synthesis and its undeniable influence on later scholars of religion, anthropology, and psychology make it an indispensable work.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Questo volume raccoglie i saggi con i quali la psicoanalisi uscì per la prima volta dal campo strettamente medico per tentare un'interpretazione radicalmente nuova della realtà umana. L'orrore per l'incesto, i sentimenti di odio e amore verso le figure genitoriali, legati al complesso edipico, trovano nel raffronto con la psicologia "primitiva" conferme e spunti per un ulteriore approfondimento. 
(piopas)
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.5)
0.5
1 5
1.5 2
2 15
2.5 3
3 40
3.5 9
4 44
4.5 5
5 23

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 166,127,955 books! | Top bar: Always visible