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A Bride's Story, Vol. 1 by Kaoru Mori
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A Bride's Story, Vol. 1 (edition 2011)

by Kaoru Mori

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2401648,049 (4.31)46
Member:usagijihen
Title:A Bride's Story, Vol. 1
Authors:Kaoru Mori
Info:Yen Press (2011), Edition: Reprint, Hardcover, 192 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:read, reviewed, own, best of 2011, manga

Work details

A Bride's Story, Volume 1 by Kaoru Mori

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  1. 00
    Emma, Volume 1 by Kaoru Mori (electronicmemory)
    electronicmemory: Beautifully drawn and charmingly written historical fiction.
  2. 00
    Ōoku: The Inner Chambers, Vol. 1 by Fumi Yoshinaga (electronicmemory)
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» See also 46 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
Brilliant! Kaoru Mori's masterful Bride's Story is a magnum opus of a manga. Her richly textured Central Asian clothing parallel a story rich with fascinating characters. The protagonist Amir is so kind-hearted and true it almost doesn't feel real (she could easily pass for Belldandy), but her compassion and fear and love are always brimming to the surface as well. Karluk, her prepubescent husband is the picture of responsibility and the reader feels his wonder right along side him at his wife's astounding hunting and sewing skills. The slow plot points and realistic sense of distance and time in volume one are reminiscent of many good Asian stories. Additionally, it's lighthearted and fun tales mixed with emotional upheaval would fit well into women's lit. Bride's Story will make you feel young at heart and wish you could meet Mori's characters in real life. ( )
  senbei | Apr 26, 2014 |
The artwork grabbed me first. Then I saw it was historical fiction. Then I gushed more about the artwork. It really is fantastic. The story wouldn’t be nearly as interesting I think without the detailed art. The slight facial expressions and movements give much more to the story than I would have thought possible. I actually don’t know if it was a good idea to pick this one up. I might not like any other art after this. :) I haven’t quite been hooked by the story yet but I will be continuing this one. ( )
1 vote Kassilem | Dec 31, 2013 |
This is only the first volume, but I'm already pretty sure I'm going to love this series as much as I loved Emma.

I'm willing to admit that this series might not be for everyone (although the thought brings me pain). Those looking for fast-paced action may find themselves bored by this volume. Amir's hunting skills add a little action, but a larger portion of the story is devoted to things like a child's fascination with an elderly woodworker's creations, Amir and Karluk looking for signs of Karluk's uncle, and Amir worrying about a sick Karluk.

If you're like me, though, and have a fondness for slice-of-life stories and lots and lots of character interaction that is as much about the characters' expressions, body language, and actions as it is about what they're saying, all of it made even better by gorgeous art...well, you'll probably love this.

When I first heard about this series, I was sold on it the instant I saw the name "Kaoru Mori." If this had been created by someone else, I probably would have at least read some reviews before ordering it, just to find out how the "12-year-old husband, 20-year-old bride" aspect would be handled - fortunately, Mori can be trusted not to turn that set-up into something icky. For now, at least, Amir is more like a big sister, although there are already some hints that their relationship will eventually become more.

It's clear that Amir and Karluk get along pretty well, and there are some very cute scenes involving the two of them, my favorite being the one in which a very serious, slightly drunk Karluk tells Amir that he never once wished she were younger. This was after an evening spent talking with Karluk's uncle's family, who clearly did not approve of Amir's age but never came right out and said so to her or Karluk's faces. So far, Amir seems to be taking all of this fairly well. I'll be interested to see if her age becomes even more of an issue in future volumes - from the look of things, everyone, even people from her old tribe, thinks she married at far too old an age. I wonder why she didn't marry at the usual age (15 or 16, according to Mori's afterword)?

I can't wait for the next volume, which I'm guessing will feature more scenes with Amir's family. I'm really looking forward to getting to see more of Amir's older brother - not so surprising, considering my usual tastes in characters. Right now, I think I'm mostly drawn to him for his slight resemblance to Rayek from Wendy and Richard Pini's Elfquest (it's the eyes and attitude). I hope future volumes don't reveal him to be a completely terrible person that I need to hate. I'm a little worried that he and the two cousins are going to attack the Eihon family and take Amir by force.

Overall, this volume is excellent, although it may be a little too slow-paced for some. Yen Press chose to release this in hardcover format, which means that it costs more than most paperback manga but will hold up to multiple rereads better (public and academic libraries, buy this please!). I'm pretty sure this is the first time I've ever read a right-to-left manga volume in hardcover - my hands kept wanting to hold it the way I would a hardcover read left-to-right, although I adjusted pretty quickly. The book jacket is lovely, although the spine art is so narrow that the slightest mistake in how the jacket was folded will cause misalignment - I, personally, don't mind this, since my bookshelves are too crammed to properly display anything anyway. The full-color jacket art is so pretty that it almost makes me wish the entire volume were in color, except that I think the sensory overload probably would have been too much for me.

Extras:

There's a 3 page manga afterword by Kaoru Mori, in which she explains how she came up with A Bride's Story. She also includes a chart that explains characters and their relationships to one another - usually, I find this sort of thing to be redundant, but, in this case, some of the relationship details aren't always very obvious, so the chart is actually pretty helpful.

(Original review, with read-alikes and watch-alikes, posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.) ( )
  Familiar_Diversions | Sep 24, 2013 |
I really like it. I'm a fan of Kaoru Mori work during her Emma days (and the subsequently anime), so I am familiar with the details she did (like giving some history in Victorian era etc) so this novel is like a breeze. And nomadic Mongolian aren't a foreign idea for me either (being me a TVB wuxia dynasty geek) nor is the idea of arrange marriage.

My sister is getting the later volumes so I shall wait for it.

One thing that bugs me, Amir is a boy's name, the japanese edition might call her Amiru, which is less awkward but for the American translation to turn it into Amir is just weird for me. Oh well, Its a nice reading. I haven't been reading any manga ever since university (lack of internet connection do wonders on your patience), I usually go back and read my usual manga after dozen of chapters later (since these kind of manga are monthly per chapter of 12 pages or so). ( )
  aoibhealfae | Sep 23, 2013 |
I really like it. I'm a fan of Kaoru Mori work during her Emma days (and the subsequently anime), so I am familiar with the details she did (like giving some history in Victorian era etc) so this novel is like a breeze. And nomadic Mongolian aren't a foreign idea for me either (being me a TVB wuxia dynasty geek) nor is the idea of arrange marriage.

My sister is getting the later volumes so I shall wait for it.

One thing that bugs me, Amir is a boy's name, the japanese edition might call her Amiru, which is less awkward but for the American translation to turn it into Amir is just weird for me. Oh well, Its a nice reading. I haven't been reading any manga ever since university (lack of internet connection do wonders on your patience), I usually go back and read my usual manga after dozen of chapters later (since these kind of manga are monthly per chapter of 12 pages or so). ( )
  aoibhealfae | Sep 23, 2013 |
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Book description
Amira is twenty years old when she marries her husband, a boy named Karluk from a neighbouring village. Adjusting to life in a new household can be trying for any young bride, and Amira's husband is eight years her junior.
Amira was a strong, sophisticated hunter and horsewoman in her village, but though their villages were next to each other, their customs are very different. As Amira introduces Karluk to the foods and pastimes that were popular among her comrades back home, the warmth she feels for her young husband grows.
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As she and her husband adjust to their arranged marriage, Amir strives to find her role as she settles into a new life and a new home in a society quick to define that role for her.

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