HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Mornings in Jenin (2006)

by Susan Abulhawa

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8235720,009 (3.99)107
Palestine, 1941. In the small village of Ein Hod a father leads a procession of his family and workers through the olive groves. As they move through the trees the green fruits drop onto the orchard floor; the ancient cycle of the seasons providing another bountiful harvest. 1948. The Abulheja family are forcibly removed from their ancestral home in Ein Hod and sent to live in a refugee camp in Jenin. Through Amal, the bright granddaughter of the patriarch, we witness the stories of her brothers- one, a stolen boy who becomes an Israeli soldier; the other who in sacrificing everything for the Palestinian cause will become his enemy. Amal's own dramatic story threads its way through six decades of Palestinian-Israeli tension, eventually taking her into exile in Pensylvania in America. Amal's is a story of love and loss, of childhood, marriage and parenthood, and finally the need to share her history with her daughter, to preserve the greatest love she has. Richly told and full of humanity, Mornings in Jenin forces us to take a fresh look at one of the defining political conflicts of our lifetime. It is an extraordinary debut.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 107 mentions

English (52)  German (2)  Swedish (2)  Norwegian (1)  Italian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (59)
Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
Reading this book in the middle of what is going on in the Middle East right now was difficult, but this book is very well done. 4.5 stars. The Abulhejas are forced out of their village and home, and herded along with others into a refugee camp in Jenin, losing everything from their simple, beautiful Palestinian village of Ein Hod. Amal is born in the camp to the bookish, Hasan, and his beautiful Bedouin wife, Dalia. Much of the family's misery is created by the kidnapping by an Israeli soldier of her older brother, Ismael, taken from his mother's arms, and grows up in a Jewish home as David. In 1967, Amal experiences hides in a hole in the ground with her best friend, an event that will forever change her family's life. Her father who wants an education for her is never seen again, her mother slips into dementia, and her older brother Yousef will soon leave to join the resistance.

Amal moves away, starting in a orphanage, and then moving to the U.S. on a scholarship, after falling in love and getting pregnant She experiences western life and the contradictions it poses for Palestinians, like herself. She and daughter Sara eventually travel to a refugee camp in Lebanon to reconnect with her brother. Just as stability seems to be coming back to her life, tragedy strikes again. Abulhawa's writing is compelling and powerful.
( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Questo romanzo contiene esattamente tutto ciò che cerco in una lettura: la Storia, le emozioni, personaggi coerenti e ben delineati, una scrittura fluida e incalzante (ottima anche la traduzione, evidentemente).

Un libro intenso che alza il velo sui fatti accaduti su quelle terre contese tra palestinesi ed ebrei di ritorno dalla Shoah e occultati dalle cronache redatte dai vincitori.

La Storia quindi raccontata dai vinti, dagli oppressi, da quelli che ancora oggi vengono chiamati terroristi.
( )
  LauraLaLunga | Feb 15, 2021 |
Very sad and eye opening, it was a bit confusing at first with who was who, but once I got past that I enjoyed it.
I hadn’t realised how awful this part of history/ present day, is and was.
( )
  karenshann | Dec 31, 2019 |
When about 10, became obsessed with reading everything about the Holocaust. Those books -- totally unsuitable for a child --strongly impressed me with the irrationality of anti-Semitism and the need of Jews to protect themselves from a future recurrence. Because of my profession and locations (currently Upper West Side of NYC), I've continued to be exposed primarily to the pro-Israeli, somewhat paranoid perspective of Jews for whom the Holocaust is never out of mind.

This book was the first of what are probably hundreds, if not thousands, of novels written entirely from the Palestinian point of view. Four generations of women's lives are described from 1948 on. Altho I've (of course) known that many people were displaced, this novel describes the situation in a fresh light. As a Jewish friend said, the basic question is whether you believe that Israel must continue to exist. For Jews, the answer is yes and everything flows from that. This book shows part of that "everything."

I was undoubtedly overimpressed by this book because of my personal background. Nonetheless, in a country known as a stalwart friend of Israel, I wonder how many others would benefit from reading even this obviously strongly biased account. ( )
  abycats | May 11, 2018 |
I try to limit the number of these sorts of books I read in year, because they are so depressing. As someone who is neither Jewish nor Palestinian, I am not personally connected to the 'conflict in Israel' tha has been going on since long before I was born. I know enough about it, though, that this novel was not a history lesson for me, more a reminder of the ugliness that humans can create for each other. I have Jewish and Palestinian friends, and have learned to remain respectfully silent about the violence and cruelty both sides continue to show each other in Israel. I can't stop the hatred and evil between these peoples, no matter how much I dwell on it, so I make sure I tune in every so often to what is happening in that part of the planet, and then go on with my own life as best I can.
Books like this one bring the evils of humanity back into focus. In this story, we follow a Palestinian family from a pre-1940's peaceful village that grew olives, through the atrocities of WW2 and the 'birth' of Israel, to the still-ongoing simmer of evil perpetuated by both sides. Since this book follows a Palestinian family, we see mostly the evils visited on Palestinians by Israelis (a side that the American government has long been eager to suppress from American awareness). But from the stories American media does cover about the evils Palestinians visit on Israelis, I knew all the while I was reading this book that there are always more evils going on just off screen. The 'good guys', those non-combatant civilians who just want to live in safety and some sort of comfort, become the victims of both sides, and so long as Israel exists and has not yet completed its implied genocide of the Palestinian people, the violence seems like it must go on forever.
Do I recommend this book? Of course. Israel is not the only place on Earth where we have created a perpetual cycle of evil, but it is a very important one because it is so visible and contained, and maybe if we ever figure out how to achieve lasting peace in Israel, we can apply what we learn to other places and 'conflicts'. But this is not a book to inspire hope for a better future. Reading this story may result in temporary dislike of humans, for the fact that the people who are doing the evil in this book are not monsters, but normal, nice people, not much different from everyone you yourself know and trust. Working out the nature of the evil in Israel and Chechnya and Sudan and everywhere else it has taken root is going to require really looking at it and recognizing that none of us are immune to it, and if we are not perpetuating the evil, there may be a time when we get to become its victims instead. (And yes, for the rest of the year I'll be reading happier or less realistic books and recovering some capacity to like humans again.) ( )
  JBarringer | Dec 30, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
The everyday life of cramped conditions, poverty, restriction, and the fear of soldiers, guns, checkpoints and beatings, would have been enough to make the novel unforgettable, but Abulhawa's writing also shines, at best assured and unsentimental.
 
Mornings in Jenin (Susan Abulhawa)
This book is the story of Amal Abulheja and her family spanning 54 years. It starts in 1948 when the family is removed from their home in Ein Hod and forced to live as refugees in Jenin. It is a tragic tale of war and loss, yet is also a story of family bonding, love and dedication.

Amal goes through war and conflict between Palestine (Muslims) and Israel (Jewish). She is a strong proud woman, with tragedy following her. The vivid detail of war and terror is heart felt and grabbed me by the heart. It is difficult for one to imagine to live as refuges, with curfews and fear, bombs gunfire and death. The graphic detail of the treatment of the refuges, especially the children was heart wrenching. All the lives lost is saddening. This story left an impression. One that makes me want peace within the world, more than ever before. How this will happen, I have no clue.

I admit I know little of the conflict between Palestine & Israel and I suppose most of the world does not understand, nor know as well. (I could be wrong, but it is my opinion). I found this an unforgettable read. I highly recommend Mornings In Jenin and would love to read more by Ms. Abulhawa.
added by SheriAWilkinson | editPrinceton, Il., Sheri A Wilkinson (Dec 13, 1901)
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
For Natalie, and for Seif
First words
Amal wanted a closer look into the soldier's eyes, but the muzzle of his automatic rifle, pressed against her forehead, would not allow it.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Mornings in Jenin was also published as The Scar of David.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Palestine, 1941. In the small village of Ein Hod a father leads a procession of his family and workers through the olive groves. As they move through the trees the green fruits drop onto the orchard floor; the ancient cycle of the seasons providing another bountiful harvest. 1948. The Abulheja family are forcibly removed from their ancestral home in Ein Hod and sent to live in a refugee camp in Jenin. Through Amal, the bright granddaughter of the patriarch, we witness the stories of her brothers- one, a stolen boy who becomes an Israeli soldier; the other who in sacrificing everything for the Palestinian cause will become his enemy. Amal's own dramatic story threads its way through six decades of Palestinian-Israeli tension, eventually taking her into exile in Pensylvania in America. Amal's is a story of love and loss, of childhood, marriage and parenthood, and finally the need to share her history with her daughter, to preserve the greatest love she has. Richly told and full of humanity, Mornings in Jenin forces us to take a fresh look at one of the defining political conflicts of our lifetime. It is an extraordinary debut.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Four generations of a Palestinian family struggle to survive during more than sixty years of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, finding themselves on both sides of the fighting.
Við stofnun Ísraelsríkis 1948 er palestínsk fjölskylda hrakin úr þorpinu þar sem ættin hefur búið öldum saman og í kjölfarið finnur hún sér hæli í flóttamannabúðunum í Jenín. Á leiðinni hverfur eitt barnanna, ungur drengur sem elst upp í gyðingdómi, en bróðir hans fórnar öllu fyrir málstað Palestínumanna. Systirin Amal flyst til Bandaríkjanna en snýr aftur og kynnist ást, missi og hefndarþorsta. Saga fjölskyldunnar er saga palestínsku þjóðarinnar, flóttamanna í sextíu ár – einlæg og mannleg frásögn sem oft hefur verið líkt við Flugdrekahlauparann.Susan Abulhawa er sjálf barn palestínskra flóttamanna en fluttist til Bandaríkjanna á unglingsárum. Bókin, sem bregður nýju ljósi á deilurnar við botn Miðjarðarhafs, hefur þegar vakið mikla athygli og verið gefin út í fjölmörgum löndum.
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.99)
0.5
1 5
1.5
2 15
2.5 3
3 17
3.5 5
4 70
4.5 18
5 58

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,497,456 books! | Top bar: Always visible