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The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the…
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The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (edition 2020)

by Michelle Alexander (Author)

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4,0971142,353 (4.42)312
This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.… (more)
Member:LibarbarianElizabeth
Title:The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Authors:Michelle Alexander (Author)
Info:The New Press (2020), Edition: Anniversary, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work Information

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle ALEXANDER

  1. 00
    Black And Catholic in the Jim Crow South: The Stuff That Makes Community by Danny Duncan Collum (fulner)
    fulner: Black and Catholic explorers the loves of those who loved through double discrimination. In 21st century America we have a hard time imaging Southern Baptists and Catholics being bitter enemies but in the Jim crow South Catholics were less trusted than negros, a black one even worse. The new Jim crow shows the legal separation of the mid 20th century still e exists but in a way now the white liberals don't care.… (more)
  2. 00
    Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall (fannyprice)
  3. 00
    Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond by Marc Lamont Hill (Othemts)
  4. 00
    Crime Control as Industry by Nils Christie (davidgn)
  5. 00
    A Costly American Hatred by Joseph Rodney Dole (arethusarose)
    arethusarose: A broad look at the American penal system with an emphasis on Illinois. What is astonishing about this book is that the author is in prison in Illinois, spent years in a supermax prison, and yet managed to do substantial research and construct clear, cogent work on the US penal system. He is also brave to publish this work while still in prison.… (more)
  6. 00
    Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America by Jill Leovy (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Books deal with different, but related issues. Both are important.
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» See also 312 mentions

English (113)  Spanish (1)  All languages (114)
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
OMGosh. What a disturbing book but everyone should read it. It made me look at things very differently. Our justice system is so messed up and is especially biased against poor and even more so poor black people. We have got to change things in this country. We are supposed to all be equal. If you can read this and not see injustice, there is a problem with you. ( )
  KyleneJones | Apr 25, 2022 |
Narrated by Karen Pittman and Amanda Cobb. ( )
  Salsabrarian | Mar 22, 2022 |
Read this to better understand and participate in our society. ( )
  rinila | Feb 25, 2022 |
I remain surprised that neither Alexander nor those in the abolition (of the police force) people have anything good to say about Obama. She does say that they have to be willing to upset their allies in order to accomplish their end goals. I certainly see that in play all the time and have to think it's a bad idea. She's very upset that so much effort is being put into maintaining affirmative action saying that effort should be put into abolishing the Jim Crow prison system instead. Her solutions seem to me to be a bit like shooting yourself in the foot. The one idea I got, and that I have always maintained, is that it would be advantageous to find a way to turn the movement into one of uplifting all people in poverty, not just Black people in poverty thus decreasing the animosity of poor whites and the ability to use that animosity to push white supremacy. I think that's very important, but it looks like trump has figured out he can suck all that animosity into momentum for his "America First" take over. I can't say the problem is unsolvable, but it sure seems to have everyone perplexed. But I agree completely that the War On Drugs is completely misguided and dangerous and has to go. ( )
1 vote Citizenjoyce | Feb 7, 2022 |
The New Jim Crow is hard to read but vitally important. Hard to read, I started and put it aside twice before I finished it on the third attempt. Is the "War on drugs" really a racist political ploy to get working class whites to vote Republican? Author Michelle Alexander makes a convincing that is exactly that. A result of Nixon's Southern Strategy and the tough on crime campaigns that followed. The result was mass incarceration of millions of black men for drug offenses. Alexander shows that the war on drugs efforts were largely directed at black communities while using and selling illegal drugs is just as prevalent among whites. I have no drought that she is right. My career in prisons and jails showed me that many more black and brown men were doing long prison terms for nonviolent drug crimes. I know that whites use and sell drugs in equal proportions but all the enforcement is aimed at nonwhites. Everyone should put on an open mind and read this book. ( )
  MMc009 | Jan 30, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
Quoting Alexander: "I consider myself a prison abolitionist, in the sense that I think we will eventually end the prisons as we know them. That doesn’t mean that I don’t think we don’t need to remove people from the community who pose a serious threat or who cause serious harm for some period of time. But the question is do we want to create and maintain sites that are designed for the intentional infliction of needless suffering? Because that’s what prison is today. They are sites where we treat people as less than human and put them in literal cages and intentionally inflict harm and suffering on them and then expect that this will somehow improve them. It’s nonsensical, immoral, and counterproductive, and that is what I would like to see come to an end."
 
Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.
added by 2wonderY | editPublisher's Weekly
 

» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
ALEXANDER, Michelleprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chilton, KarenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
West, CornelForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Wikipedia in English (41)

American juvenile justice system

City of Los Angeles v. Lyons

Comparison of United States incarceration rate with other countries

Jim Crow laws

Michelle Alexander

Prison

United States presidential election in Idaho, 1984

United States presidential election in Illinois, 1984

United States presidential election in Iowa, 1984

United States presidential election in Kansas, 1984

United States presidential election in Kentucky, 1984

United States presidential election in Louisiana, 1984

United States presidential election in Oklahoma, 1984

United States presidential election in Oregon, 1984

United States presidential election in Rhode Island, 1984

United States presidential election in South Carolina, 1984

United States presidential election in South Dakota, 1984

United States presidential election in Tennessee, 1984

This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.

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