HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Have you checked out SantaThing, LibraryThing's gift-giving tradition?
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the…
Loading...

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (edition 2010)

by Michelle Alexander

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,263932,860 (4.43)265
This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.… (more)
Member:AskAn_Atheist
Title:The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Authors:Michelle Alexander
Info:New Press, The (2010), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 290 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

Recently added byelysium753, private library, alvaror, cjw509, riannacohen, MDavis711, carter92, coffeefairy, Lainna
  1. 00
    Black And Catholic in the Jim Crow South: The Stuff That Makes Community by Danny Duncan Collum (fulner)
    fulner: Black and Catholic explorers the loves of those who loved through double discrimination. In 21st century America we have a hard time imaging Southern Baptists and Catholics being bitter enemies but in the Jim crow South Catholics were less trusted than negros, a black one even worse. The new Jim crow shows the legal separation of the mid 20th century still e exists but in a way now the white liberals don't care.… (more)
  2. 00
    Nobody by Marc Lamont Hill (Othemts)
  3. 00
    Crime Control as Industry by Nils Christie (davidgn)
  4. 00
    A Costly American Hatred by Joseph Rodney Dole (arethusarose)
    arethusarose: A broad look at the American penal system with an emphasis on Illinois. What is astonishing about this book is that the author is in prison in Illinois, spent years in a supermax prison, and yet managed to do substantial research and construct clear, cogent work on the US penal system. He is also brave to publish this work while still in prison.… (more)
  5. 00
    Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America by Jill Leovy (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Books deal with different, but related issues. Both are important.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 265 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 92 (next | show all)
wow. this is an utterly devastating look at our criminal "justice" system, especially in relation to the war on drugs and targeting of black men. also she really explains how we are told that black men are arrested for violent crime and that we are fed that falsehood, but that the reality is quite different. (truly integrating that knowledge, i think, will take a while, because of how ingrained the lies are.) reading this felt a lot like it used to feel when i first learned about oppressions and how they operate. this book is hard, eye-opening, and so hugely important in explaining how mass incarceration from the war on drugs has not made communities safer, drugs less common, drug use lower, and has intentionally and with lasting repercussions decimated the black (and to a lesser extent the brown) populations that were inching their way to too much equality. the ruination of the 4th amendment and the money and materials grab from police departments is stunning and crushing, and probably the biggest takeaway from this book for me, personally.

she managed to take huge concepts and make it readable and accessible. this isn't hard to read, except that in content it's so gutting. her explanations of it all is so well done and so convincingly written.

"Every system of injustice depends on the silence, paralysis, confusion, and cooperation of those it seeks to eliminate or control."

"White people are generally allowed to have problems, and they've historically been granted the power to define and respond to them. But people of color - in this 'land of the free' forged through slavery and genocide - are regularly viewed and treated as the problem.

This distinction has made all the difference. Once human beings are defined as the problem in the public consciousness, their elimination through deportation, incarceration, or even genocide becomes nearly inevitable. White nationalism, at its core, reflects a belief that our nation's problems would be solved if only people of color could somehow be gotten rid of, or at least better controlled. In short, mass incarceration and mass deportation have less to do with crime and immigration than the ways we've chosen to respond to those issues when black and brown people are framed as the problem. ...[T]hroughout our nation's history, when crime and immigration have been perceived as white, our nation's response has been radically different from when those phenomena have been defined as black or brown. The systems of mass incarceration and mass deportation may seem entirely unrelated at first glance, but they are both deeply rooted in our racial history, and they both have expanded in part because of the enormous profits to be made in controlling, exploiting, and eliminating vulnerable human beings."

"Human rights champion Bryan Stevenson has observed that 'slavery didn't end; it evolved.'"

"White supremacy, over time, became a religion of sorts. Faith in the idea that people of the African race were bestial, that whites were inherently superior, and that slavery was, in fact, for blacks' own good, served to alleviate the white conscience and reconcile the tension between slavery and the democratic ideals espoused by whites in the so-called New World. There was no contradiction in the bold claim made by Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence that 'all men are created equal' if Africans were not really people. Racism operated as a deeply held belief system based on 'truths' beyond question or doubt. This deep faith in white supremacy not only justified an economic and political system in which plantation owners acquired land and great wealth through the brutality, torture, and coercion of other human beings; it also endured, like most articles of faith, long after the historical circumstances that gave rise to the religion passed away. In Wacquant's words: 'Racial division was a consequence, not a precondition of slavery, but once it was instituted it became detached from its initial function and acquired a social potency all its own.' After the death of slavery, the idea of race lived on."

"As numerous researchers have shown, violent crime rates have fluctuated over the years and bear little relationship to incarceration rates - which have soared during the past three decades regardless of whether violent crime was going up or down."

"No other country in the world disenfranchises people who are released from prison in a manner even remotely resembling the United States. In fact, the United Nations Human Rights Committee has charged the U.S. disenfranchisement policies are discriminatory and violate international law."

"The widespread and mistaken belief that racial animus is necessary for the creation and maintenance of racialized systems of social control is the most important reason that we, as a nation, have remained in deep denial." ( )
  overlycriticalelisa | Nov 5, 2020 |
The author shows how systematic racism is sewn into our nation. She doesn't hold back or cut corners. Her writing is powerful and it flows well. She address the huge role media plays in forming our mental images about a race of a person. A downside to this book is that it seems like its directed audience is towards people who know the subject very well but she does a good job on bringing the spotlight to the injustices of our Justice system. ( )
  danafriedlander | Nov 5, 2020 |
Holy shitballs! This book connected so many dots. It should be required reading fir everyone. ( )
  Chris.Bulin | Oct 1, 2020 |
This is the first audiobook I've ever finished in full! Powerful, powerful research regarding mass incarceration and race in the United States. Highly recommend. ( )
  askannakarenina | Sep 16, 2020 |
This is the first audiobook I've ever finished in full! Powerful, powerful research regarding mass incarceration and race in the United States. Highly recommend. ( )
  askannakarenina | Sep 16, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 92 (next | show all)
Quoting Alexander: "I consider myself a prison abolitionist, in the sense that I think we will eventually end the prisons as we know them. That doesn’t mean that I don’t think we don’t need to remove people from the community who pose a serious threat or who cause serious harm for some period of time. But the question is do we want to create and maintain sites that are designed for the intentional infliction of needless suffering? Because that’s what prison is today. They are sites where we treat people as less than human and put them in literal cages and intentionally inflict harm and suffering on them and then expect that this will somehow improve them. It’s nonsensical, immoral, and counterproductive, and that is what I would like to see come to an end."
 
Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.
added by 2wonderY | editPublisher's Weekly
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alexander, Michelleprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chilton, KarenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
West, CornelForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (41)

American juvenile justice system

City of Los Angeles v. Lyons

Comparison of United States incarceration rate with other countries

Jim Crow laws

Michelle Alexander

Prison

United States presidential election in Idaho, 1984

United States presidential election in Illinois, 1984

United States presidential election in Iowa, 1984

United States presidential election in Kansas, 1984

United States presidential election in Kentucky, 1984

United States presidential election in Louisiana, 1984

United States presidential election in Oklahoma, 1984

United States presidential election in Oregon, 1984

United States presidential election in Rhode Island, 1984

United States presidential election in South Carolina, 1984

United States presidential election in South Dakota, 1984

United States presidential election in Tennessee, 1984

This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.43)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 2
3 30
3.5 9
4 140
4.5 34
5 223

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 152,531,454 books! | Top bar: Always visible