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The Sandman Volume 1: 30th Anniversary…
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The Sandman Volume 1: 30th Anniversary Edition: Preludes and Nocturnes (original 1991; edition 2018)

by Neil Gaiman (Author)

Series: The Sandman (1 (Issues 1-8))

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
10,382231508 (4.21)1 / 474
An occultist attempting to capture Death to bargain for eternal life traps her younger brother, Dream, instead. After his 70 year imprisonment and eventual escape, Dream, a.k.a. The Sandman, goes on a quest for his lost objects of power. Author Neil Gaiman creates an unforgettable tale of the forces that exist beyond life and death by weaving ancient mythology, folklore and fairy tales with his own distinct narrative vision.… (more)
Member:Heri_Potter
Title:The Sandman Volume 1: 30th Anniversary Edition: Preludes and Nocturnes
Authors:Neil Gaiman (Author)
Info:DC Comics (2018), Edition: 30th Anniversary, 240 pages
Collections:Your library, Favorites
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The Sandman Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturnes by Neil Gaiman (1991)

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» See also 474 mentions

English (223)  German (2)  Hungarian (1)  French (1)  Danish (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Norwegian (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (231)
Showing 1-5 of 223 (next | show all)
Sandman is often considered one of the best of the best when it comes to graphic novels and... for good reason. It's very very good. It's got immortal 'anthropomorphic personifications' (Dream is the main character, but we also get a bit of Death), a crazy deep/complicate mythos, dark and creepy imagery, and a wacky awesome storyline. Pretty much right up my alley. There's little I could do better than the blurb on Goodreads:

In PRELUDES & NOCTURNES, an occultist attempting to capture Death to bargain for eternal life traps her younger brother Dream instead. After his 70 year imprisonment and eventual escape, Dream, also known as Morpheus, goes on a quest for his lost objects of power. On his arduous journey, Morpheus encounters Lucifer, John Constantine, and an all-powerful madman.

It's... about as crazy and awesome as it sounds.

On bit of weirdness that I haven't seen much in other graphic novels is that this is a more 'mainline' comic, in that it's set in the same universe and can reference all manner of other characters, such as John Constantine (I need to read Hellblazer at some point), Batman, and others. It's... a bit weird and jarring to have the references, but once you get used to it, it's pretty cool.

Well worth the read and I'm curious to see Dream's journey as he continues to regain his powers.

Some pretty pictures/spoilers:



This never ends well. And... oops. You didn't even manage to get Death anyways. I doubt that would have gone well had you.



Such language.



Man Hecate is bizarre in this one. I like it.



Here's what I was really talking about with the references. I mean, Constantine doesn't feel that out of place, it's the same sort of story, but Batman... realy?



Yeah. I really need to read Hellblazer.



That's actually a really interesting point. And a way for Dream to negotiate with Demons.



I love the juxtaposition of this page. This story gets all sorts of gruesome.



A madman with the stolen power of dreams messing with reality. Perfectly creepy.



Dream's mask is ... weird. But kind of cool? Well set up for cosplay?



Oh Death. There's a reason that people think she's kind of gothchick awesome. Even if she's not in that *terribly* much so far as I understand. But how does she end up interacting with Thanos?



That... is a wonderful bit of wordplay.
( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
Note; date started is approximate.

4.5 stars

This isn't the sort of thing I'd usually end up reading (even if it should be, given what I like) so I'm not entirely sure how to judge it.

That said, it definitely hits some notes that I like; the metaphors or symbols that show up help give it a sense of meaning (meaningfulness?), which I really like (here, and in general). The only other Gaiman book I'd read before was Good Omens , and in retrospect, this shares some of the best things about it (the symbolism and mythology aspects). Also, while I'm on this tangent; Gaiman can turn things dark FAST.

I suppose there's a bit of a reimagining of the typical quest/lost and found plot; it ended on a sort of subtle self-discovery ish note. The Sound of Her Wings gets extra points for introducing Death(I suspect that this is a bit of a cliché now...); I'd read about the concept before, and this first taste of its execution definitely lived up to expectations. ( )
  Dulnath | Jun 27, 2021 |
Just didn't do it for me...got about halfway through, frustrated, and realized I missed using my imagination. ( )
  LibroLindsay | Jun 18, 2021 |
It's interesting rereading this first volume of The Sandman years after I first finished the season. It's a bit of a mixed bag for me, with the plot a little scattered and some very uneven artwork. But it's also immediately clear just how much of the magic that the series is known for is present from its first issue. Gaiman has always had a gift with words, a talent at spinning truly poetic descriptions of characters, things, and places we've never seen. His work in these first eight issues shouldn't be undervalued - there's some great stuff here (particularly in the sixth and eighth issues).

The plot is fairly simple and surprisingly episodic - after being captured by a magician and imprisoned for 80 years, Morpheus must go on a quest to recover three artifacts that were stolen from him and contain pieces of his power. The rest of the story follows him as he goes from place to place, in search of these artifacts. It's not the most complex of storyline, but it works for what it has to do: introduce us to the world of the comic. It's rather impressive how little of these issues feel like exposition dumps; instead, Gaiman uses this quest as a way to explain the various aspects of the series to us in a naturalistic way. And it works extremely well and proves very entertaining, even if I wouldn't say this first volume is a high point of the series.

The artwork, though, is a bit less enjoyable for me. The first five issues are illustrated by Sam Kieth while the latter three are illustrated by Mike Dringenberg. Neither Kieth nor Dringenberg's styles proved to be ones that I enjoyed. It's not that their artwork is bad - far from it, in fact - it's just that it wasn't really my style and it always makes it a bit difficult for me to fully immerse myself in the story. On top of that, the fact that Dringenberg takes over partway through the arc gives the whole thing a sort of visual mishmash. He does a solid job of match Kieth's style, but you can still tell it's a different artist doing the work and it detracts a bit from the experience for me.

All that said, though, Preludes & Nocturnes is still a great read. It's always fun to revisit the tale that begun The Sandman. So much of the magic the series is known for is present from its very first issue and it will always be enjoyable to sit down and experience this beginning again and again. It's a great spot for the story to begin and it's a great read. ( )
  thoroughlyme | Apr 23, 2021 |
A decent start to an exceptional series. This was certainly not the best of the series, but it starts the journey off in a compelling-enough way to make me want to keep reading through the rest of the books (for the third time). ( )
  evenlake | Mar 23, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 223 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gaiman, Neilprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jones III, MalcolmIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Busch, RobbieColoristsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dringenberg, MikeIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kieth, SamIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Klein, ToddLetterersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
McKean, DaveCover artistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Vozzo, DannyColoristsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Berger, KarenIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"But where shall wisdom be found? And where is the place of understanding? Man knoweth not the price thereof; neither is it found in the land of the living... for the price of wisdom is above rubies."
-- The Book of Job, chapter 28, verses 12, 13, 18
"D is for lots of things."
-- John Dee, All Fools' Day 1989
Dedication
For Dave Dickson: oldest friend.
-- Neil Gaiman
To my wife Kathy, my pal Tim, and to everyone in jail.  
-- Sam Kieth
To friends and lovers. To Sam, Malcolm, and Neil; may your talents never dim. You made working on this book an indescribable pleasure. To Karen, Tom and Art (without whom this book would not have been possible), thanks for the time and your super-human patience. Special thanks to Beth, Matte, Sigal, the incomparable Barbara Brandt (a.k.a. Victoria), Rachel, Sean F., Shawn S., Mimi, Gigi, Heather, Yann, Brantski, Mai Li, Berni Wrightson (for Cain and Abel) and, as ever, to Cinnamon.
-- Mike Dringenberg
To Little Malcolm.
-- Malcolm Jones III
First words
Wake up, sir. We're here.
Quotations
But it's funny. I always thought when I became king...
I thought there would be applause.
I though somebody would say something.
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An occultist attempting to capture Death to bargain for eternal life traps her younger brother, Dream, instead. After his 70 year imprisonment and eventual escape, Dream, a.k.a. The Sandman, goes on a quest for his lost objects of power. Author Neil Gaiman creates an unforgettable tale of the forces that exist beyond life and death by weaving ancient mythology, folklore and fairy tales with his own distinct narrative vision.

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Book description
Contains issues #1-8: Sleep of the just -- Imperfect hosts -- Dream a little dream of me -- A hope in hell -- Passengers -- 24 hours -- Sound and fury -- The sound of her wings
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