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Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a…
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Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis… (original 2010; edition 2011)

by Ben Macintyre (Author)

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1,721908,598 (3.86)191
From the acclaimed author of "Agent Zigzag" comes an extraordinary account of the most successful deception--and certainly the strangest--ever carried out in World War II, one that changed the prospects for an Allied victory. The purpose of the plan--code named Operation Mincemeat--was to deceive the Nazis into thinking that Allied forces were planning to attack southern Europe by way of Greece or Sardinia, rather than Sicily, as the Nazis had assumed, and the Allies ultimately chose.… (more)
Member:madsglen
Title:Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victor
Authors:Ben Macintyre (Author)
Info:Crown (2011), Edition: Illustrated, 432 pages
Collections:Your library
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Operation Mincemeat: The True Spy Story that Changed the Course of World War II by Ben Macintyre (2010)

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» See also 191 mentions

English (87)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (89)
Showing 1-5 of 87 (next | show all)
Interesting story about deception during WWII. Have to believe there were many episodes of subterfuge during the war that we will never hear about. Glad this one came to light. Seems like the Germans could have done a better job getting in front of this one, however, hindsight is easier then when in the moment. Wanted to read more about the exploits of the submarine commander. ( )
  bermandog | Nov 27, 2022 |
My first Ben Macintyre book and I found it an easy, compelling read. Given the complexity of the deception being described, this was no small trick. "Operation Mincemeat" was a clear narrative with historic photos of both the principles in the operation and the documents and paraphernalia employed. Four stars. ( )
  Renzomalo | Sep 16, 2022 |
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys WWII non-fiction. ( )
  Melline | Aug 13, 2022 |
A detailed, and engrossing account of the operation to deceive the Nazi war machine by floating a dead body carrying false documents onto the Spanish shoreline.

It presents a diverse cast of fascinating characters on both sides as it tracks both the genesis and practical aspects of the operation by the British Intelligence teams as well as how the documents were received and interpreted by various players in Spain and Germany.

If you’ve seen the recent movie based on this book much of it will be familiar and some things I thought were embellished for the movie turned out to be reasonably accurate. ( )
  gothamajp | Jul 6, 2022 |
2022 movie #111. 2022. As the Allies prepared to invade Sicily in WW2, British intelligence successfully pulled off a wacky plan to convince the Germans that Greece was the invasion target. Good story well told. On Netflix. ( )
  capewood | Jun 4, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 87 (next | show all)
The story of Major William Martin is the subject of the British journalist Ben Macintyre’s brilliant and almost absurdly entertaining “Operation Mincemeat”. The cast of characters involved in Mincemeat, as the caper was called, was extraordinary, and Macintyre tells their stories with gusto.
 
A terrific book with exceptional photographs of everybody, including the corpse. Students of the second world war have been familiar with Mincemeat for many years, but Macintyre offers a mass of new detail, and enchanting pen portraits of the British, Spanish and German participants. His book is a rollicking read for all those who enjoy a spy story so fanciful that Ian Fleming — himself an officer in Montagu’s wartime department — would never have dared to invent it.
 
The complexities and the consequences of the story that Macintyre tells in Operation Mincemeat are compelling — a tribute to his impressive abilities as a sleuth (ones that we’ve witnessed in his previous books) and to his capacities as a writer. He has the instincts of a novelist rather than an historian when it comes to elision, exposition, narration and pace, and his depiction of character is vividly alive to nuance and idiosyncrasy.
added by Shortride | editThe Times, William Boyd (Jan 16, 2010)
 
James Buchan says the story of 'the man who never was' deserves its latest incarnation...
 
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Epigraph
'Who in war will not have his laugh amid the skulls?'

Winston Churchill, Closing the Ring
Dedication
For

Kate & Melita

and

Magnus & Lucie
First words
[Preface] In the early hours of July 10, 1943, British and North American troops stormed ashore on the coast of Sicily in the first assault against Hitler's "Fortress Europe."
[Chapter 1] Jose Antonio Rey Maria had no intention of making history when he rowed out into the Atlantic from the coast of Andalusia in southwest Spain on April 30, 1943.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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From the acclaimed author of "Agent Zigzag" comes an extraordinary account of the most successful deception--and certainly the strangest--ever carried out in World War II, one that changed the prospects for an Allied victory. The purpose of the plan--code named Operation Mincemeat--was to deceive the Nazis into thinking that Allied forces were planning to attack southern Europe by way of Greece or Sardinia, rather than Sicily, as the Nazis had assumed, and the Allies ultimately chose.

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Book description
Near the end of WWII, two British naval officers came up with a brilliant and slightly mad scheme to mislead the Nazi armies about where the Allies would attack southern Europe. To carry out the plan, they would have to rely on the most unlikely of secret agents: a dead one. Ben Macintyre's dazzling, critically acclaimed bestseller chronicles the extraordinary story of what happened after British officials planted this dead body - outfillted in a British military uniform with a briefcase containing false intelligence documents - in Nazi territory, and how this secret mission fooled Hitler into changing military positioning, paving the way for the Allies to overtake the Nazis. (978-0-307-45328-0)
Haiku summary
Dead men tell no tales,

but this one carried secrets

to help win the war.

(legallypuzzled)

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