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Bamboo People by Mitali Perkins
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Bamboo People

by Mitali Perkins

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2912255,243 (4.1)2

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This is a powerful story about growing up in a violent and conflicted country. I enjoyed Perkins clear but deep and meaningful writing. Curricular connections - history, geography, minority issues ( )
  JillStephens | Feb 14, 2016 |
Narrated by Jonathan Davis. The Burmese conflict between the government and Burma's ethnic minorities is viewed from opposite sides and in two parts via Chiko, a child soldier for the Burmese, and Tu Reh, a Karenni teen living in a refugee camp in Thailand. The portrayal of the two sides is more nuanced than black and white; Chiko has been raised with the importance of education, while Tu Reh's father expects him to be thoughtful rather than reactive. So when the boys enter each other's orbits, there are complexities of war, violence, and the nature of enemies (and friends) for each to consider. While I don't know what a Burmese accent sounds like, narrator Davies doesn't appear to attempt trying one, instead taking a light, seemingly pan-Asian approach. His voice draws us into the story and he's most effective portraying the steely intimidating Captain. There are graphic realities presented: amputations, land mines, and wartime abuse. ( )
  Salsabrarian | Feb 2, 2016 |
Thought provoking and engaging.
  devafagan | Jan 2, 2015 |
I was interested in this for the subject matter and for paying attention to the nuts and bolts of how Mitali Perkins introduced cultural elements and wove together the stories of her two protagonists--Chiko, a Burmese boy from Yangon who's dragooned into the army against his will, and Tu Reh, a Karenni boy living in a refugee camp near the Thai border.

I liked all the characters, both the main ones and the supporting ones, very much, and I felt the emotional growth of both boys was believable and moving. There's a bit of a Christian thread in the book, but since many Karenni are converts to Christianity, this isn't out of place. I didn't find it intrusive. ( )
  FrancescaForrest | May 12, 2014 |
I was interested in this for the subject matter and for paying attention to the nuts and bolts of how Mitali Perkins introduced cultural elements and wove together the stories of her two protagonists--Chiko, a Burmese boy from Yangon who's dragooned into the army against his will, and Tu Reh, a Karenni boy living in a refugee camp near the Thai border.

I liked all the characters, both the main ones and the supporting ones, very much, and I felt the emotional growth of both boys was believable and moving. There's a bit of a Christian thread in the book, but since many Karenni are converts to Christianity, this isn't out of place. I didn't find it intrusive. ( )
  FrancescaForrest | May 12, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
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Two Burmese boys, one a Karenni refugee and the other the son of an imprisoned Burmese doctor, meet in the jungle and in order to survive they must learn to trust each other.

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Mitali Perkins is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

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Charlesbridge

An edition of this book was published by Charlesbridge.

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