HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Talking About Jane Austen in Baghdad: The True Story of an Unlikely…

by Bee Rowlatt, May Witwit (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
11510188,497 (3.64)24
May is an Iraqi lecturer living in Baghdad, dodging bullets to teach her class about Jane Austen. Bee is a London mother of three, working for the BBC World Service. They should have nothing in common. But when a simple e-mail brings them together, they discover a friendship that overcomes all their differences of culture, religion and age. And, between the grenades, the gossip, the jokes and the secrets, they hatch an ingenious plan to help May escape Baghdad.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 24 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
In 2005 Bee Rowlatt, a London journalist, sent a chance email to May Witwit, an Iraqi English lecturer, and from it a deep and touching friendship develops between the two women. Talking about "Jane Austen in Baghdad" is the exchange of these emails allowing the reader to explore the lives of the two women who have very little in common. However, as the two women share confidences, stories, jokes, tears and fears they begin to connect on many levels.

While I loved the exchange of emails, I felt that the book became a bit bogged down in the second half as May is confined to her house due to the very real dangers around her. However, the book does end happily and is certainly a worthwhile read. ( )
  HeatherLINC | Jan 22, 2016 |
I enjoyed this book a lot. Reading it made me think of the email friendship I have with a lovely lady who lives in another country. Shows how much we can support and encourage each other even if we don't live in the same country. recommend this book to anyone interested in reading about real people. ( )
  bookbatty | Jan 26, 2012 |
This is a book of email correspondence between Bee Rowlatt and May Witwit. Bee is a journalist living in London and working for the BBC World Service, and she is put in touch with May Witwit, a lecturer in Baghdad. They became extremely close friends through their emails.

This book showed a stark difference between the lives of the two women. Bee has three children and has the usual concerns of juggling work, marriage and family. May, however, tells in her emails of life living in Baghdad after the invasion and after Saddam Hussein has been overthrown. She writes of bombs, assassinations and shootings.

I started off not knowing if I would find this book a little boring, but I soon got into it and enjoyed reading about the women's lives. Bee decides to assist May in getting her and her husband out of Baghdad and over to England and the ending of the book actually moved me to tears.

Despite it being a normal email correspondence, with all the trivial details that friends often write to each other, I found this to be the sort of book where I wanted to read just another email, and then just another. It's very readable and I enjoyed it very much. ( )
  nicx27 | Dec 21, 2011 |
This book is the story of the emails that were sent between Bee Rowlatt in England, and May Witwit in Iraq. The two woman met through a phone call. Bee, a journalist was wanting to talk to someone about life in Iraq. A close friendship resulted and emails went back and forth over many years. They were never meant to be a book. Both womem reveal the details of their every day life. A great contrast. We hear of the enormous daily difficulties that May, a unviersity lecturer, and her husband face in Iraq. Their problems escalate until they reach the point where they cannot cope any longer in that country and the emails then tell of the struggle that took place to try and get them out of the country safely. This was a very moving story. The lives of the two women were so completely different. It was at times heartbreaking to read of May's life. Just to keep going on a day to day basis and not give up must have been so hard. And I felt for Bee too writing to May, and trying to keep her hopes up.- writing of things that she said felt so trivial compared with what May's life was like BUT at the same time realising that she was in fact helping to keep May going and that they had indeed become like family to each other. I wonder how May is now!!! ( )
  kiwifortyniner | Oct 17, 2011 |
Fabulous true-life correspondence between a journalist in London and an academic in Baghdad. Great insight into Iraqi life during the war. But about 100 pages too long. Could have done with some judicious editing. ( )
  helenleech | Oct 11, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rowlatt, BeeAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Witwit, MayAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Ali: for his indispensable support
For Justin and the girls: every day you make my life better
First words
17.01.05
Hello
Dear May
Thank you for agreeing to be available for interview.
Prologue: This was never meant to be a book.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

May is an Iraqi lecturer living in Baghdad, dodging bullets to teach her class about Jane Austen. Bee is a London mother of three, working for the BBC World Service. They should have nothing in common. But when a simple e-mail brings them together, they discover a friendship that overcomes all their differences of culture, religion and age. And, between the grenades, the gossip, the jokes and the secrets, they hatch an ingenious plan to help May escape Baghdad.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.64)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 3
3 7
3.5 4
4 12
4.5 2
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 162,442,922 books! | Top bar: Always visible