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The Pull of the Moon by Elizabeth Berg
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The Pull of the Moon (1996)

by Elizabeth Berg

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9594013,001 (3.72)11

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Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
I loved this book. It was like Elizabeth Berg was in my head. She understands...................wonderful read. ( )
  deb115 | Apr 26, 2018 |
I have mixed feelings about this book. Much of what the author says is true. The character feels real and is going through things that I imagine most of us experience at the middle point of our lives. Nan has a midlife crisis that doesn't involve getting a young boyfriend and buying a sportscar, but reevaluating herself in relation to those around her.

The thing that was difficult for me was the fact that Nan even had the means to have her little meltdown. No job, plenty of money, an extra car - let's hit the road! I have to have my midlife crisis between work and kids and bills, etc.!

Overall, a quick and enjoyable read. ( )
  glade1 | Apr 3, 2018 |
Elizabeth Berg has written a total of 24 books. The Pull of the Moon was her fourth. With a couple of nonfiction titles here and there, she mostly writes contemporary fiction for women.
Nan and her husband, Martin, are well-off, some would say rich, and their daughter has gone off to college. But as Nan turns 50-years old, something is missing. It’s more than that her periods have stopped. She feels as if life as passed her by.
Leaving a note off Martin, she takes off on a road trip. Following wherever the road takes her, she drifts along, trying to sort out what she truly feels. Every day, as promised, she send a letter to Martin to let him know that she is safe.
I like the way this book is written. It opens with her first letter to Martin, then is followed by her thoughts (it’s not stream of consciousness). The reader never hears from Martin. This is only Nan’s story.
Personally I thought the plot was a silly. There’s not much of a story arc and, for me, no reason, to turn the page. Yet I read every one of them, hoping to some real insight. Nan might have fit the stereotypical 1950s woman, but in 2014, it misses the mark.
I give The Pull of the Moon 3 out of 5 stars. ( )
  juliecracchiolo | Feb 16, 2018 |
I could fulminate or I can just accept the book for what it is . . . a crafted catalogue of the grievances and hurts a woman might acquire over the course of a long and basically sturdy marriage bundled into a presentation, the American classic--the solitary road trip to think things over--that alternates between being spot on, observationally and emotionally, and improbable. The strongest parts are the woman's own private reflections on her own choices, which alternate between letters to the husband and recollections. There is an abbreviated, smoothed out quality to her recollections of the past (say, the sexual freedom of the late 60's) and most of the adventures she has on the road trip itself, the interactions with the people she meets have the quality of allegory not reality. But OK, she touches upon, systematically and thoughtfully, the frustrations that many women who started out liberated and then somehow or other retreated from working or making any of their dreams come true for reasons they can't, as they hit menopause, quite understand. It's too easy to blame "men" for those choices and it's one of the more effective aspects of this really very slight and somewhat superficial book, that the narrator veers back and forth between knowing she made many of these choices out of her own fears and out of a need for support that she didn't know how to even begin asking for--not even from her husband who might have given it if she had been more articulate or whatever . . . but it is very easy to retreat from the world into a small and safe one and Berg can write well. This isn't chick lit, but it is related, the next phase, once the gilt is off the wedding silver and reality sets in, but not too much reality. I'm leaving it on the bookshelf at the B&B and it was a decent trip book. I picked it up for free too. *** ( )
1 vote sibyx | Jun 4, 2016 |
Main theme is transition in a woman's life - a 50-year-old woman, Nan, "runs away from home" to find herself as she travels the back roads of America. The story is told via diary entries and letters to her husband and grown daughter. Some happenings stretch credulity. ( )
  BookConcierge | Feb 8, 2016 |
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Dear Martin, I know you think I keep that green rock by my bed because I like its color.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0425176487, Paperback)

"Not a novel about a woman leaving home, but . . . a human being finding her way back." —Chicago Tribune

"Turning 50 seems to turn women crazy. When Nan hits this mark, she hits the road, leaving behind her home and husband. Driving west from Boston, she consults only her own pleasure. And while this sounds easy, it is often arduous for Nan, who can hardly remember what her own pleasure is . . . The Pull of the Moon is upbeat from beginning to end." —Boston Sunday Globe

"Measured, delicate, and impossible to walk away from." —Entertainment Weekly

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:27 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Appearing for the first time in a trade edition, this novel from the bestselling author of Range of Motion is about a middle-age woman who begins an impromptu trek across the country and follows the pull of the moon to find her way home, writing down her thoughts in a leather journal. "Not a novel about a woman leaving home, but a human being finding her way back."-Chicago Tribune. "Turning 50 seems to turn women crazy. When Nan hits this mark, she hits the road, leaving behind her home and husband. Driving west from Boston, she consults only her own pleasure. And while this sounds easy, it is often arduous for Nan, who can hardly remember what her own pleasure is. The Pull of the Moon is upbeat from beginning to end."-Boston Sunday Globe. "Measured, delicate, and impossible to walk away from."-Entertainment Weekly.… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

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