HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Jesus, Patrons & Benefactors: Roman Palestine & the Gospel of Luke

by Jonathan Marshall

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
3None3,496,815 (4)None
Scholars use patrons and benefactors in the interpretation of Jesus and the Gospels, but this practice needs re-evaluation. Many New Testament studies build from outdated classical scholarship and only superficial interaction with archaeological research. Recent classical studies have improved modern understanding of these ancient categories tremendously. Archaeological advances shed new light on first-century Palestine. Jonathan Marshall evaluates the categories of patrons and benefactors in light of the findings of new classical studies and archaeological work. He offers a much needed clarification between socio-historical patron-client relationships and Roman patrocinium . He also elucidates differences between patrocinium and benefaction. An in-depth investigation of cities, villages, and leadership in first-century Palestine reveals the minimal attestation of benefaction and, still less, patrocinium in the area and among the people. The dearth or, in some cases, complete lack of honorary inscriptions is one obvious pointer in this direction. An analysis of three passages in Luke (6:17-38; 14:1-24; 22:14-34) follows. The analysis demonstrates that Luke does not adopt the specific terminology of patrocinium . Use of the benefactor category is present but limited while debt to Jewish cultural influences predominates. One discovers that Luke's presentation of Jesus, in these three passages, matches well the historical realia of Jesus' day.… (more)
Recently added byZetesis

No tags

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Scholars use patrons and benefactors in the interpretation of Jesus and the Gospels, but this practice needs re-evaluation. Many New Testament studies build from outdated classical scholarship and only superficial interaction with archaeological research. Recent classical studies have improved modern understanding of these ancient categories tremendously. Archaeological advances shed new light on first-century Palestine. Jonathan Marshall evaluates the categories of patrons and benefactors in light of the findings of new classical studies and archaeological work. He offers a much needed clarification between socio-historical patron-client relationships and Roman patrocinium . He also elucidates differences between patrocinium and benefaction. An in-depth investigation of cities, villages, and leadership in first-century Palestine reveals the minimal attestation of benefaction and, still less, patrocinium in the area and among the people. The dearth or, in some cases, complete lack of honorary inscriptions is one obvious pointer in this direction. An analysis of three passages in Luke (6:17-38; 14:1-24; 22:14-34) follows. The analysis demonstrates that Luke does not adopt the specific terminology of patrocinium . Use of the benefactor category is present but limited while debt to Jewish cultural influences predominates. One discovers that Luke's presentation of Jesus, in these three passages, matches well the historical realia of Jesus' day.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,400,944 books! | Top bar: Always visible