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Everything Is Broken: A Tale of Catastrophe in Burma

by Emma Larkin

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10412263,768 (3.96)23
A deeply reported account of life inside Burma in the months following the disastrous Cyclone Nargis and an analysis of the brutal totalitarian regime that clings to power in the devastated nation.
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» See also 23 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
Rare Chance to Read About Burma

At times, this book was frustrating because Larkin (a pseudonym) wrote too much about her difficulty in reporting rather than what was happening to the population. She gives great detail into how non-governmental organizations in Burma dealt with Cyclone Nargis. Unfortunately, she was unable (because of restrictions on her movement) to give us much insight into what was really happening outside of Rangoon in the aftermath of the cyclone. This is one of the few books written about present-day Burma. ( )
  mvblair | Aug 9, 2020 |
Larkin is a good writer, but after a bit all the writing I'm now reading about Myanmar seems too similar. I appreciate the map at the front of the book, but I do wish there was more crucial detail about the actual event. I'm reminded of Simon Winchester's Krakatoa and the depth to which he went surrounding the explosion. I realize the book was designed to be an expose on the military in Myanmar, but that whole concept could have been done better by making the approach more scientific and linear. The humanistic side would still have been presented, but it could have been a better book if she had not tried to include material that honestly can be found elsewhere. Still good, but could have been better.... ( )
  untraveller | Nov 22, 2017 |
Wake up America and smell the lack of liberty. A deceptively small book that tells you all you need to know about how a country can slid into a military dictatorship. Everything is controlled so when a natural disaster occurs the government just waits and eventually offers just enough help for people to live but not enough to succeed. Control the TV , radio and newspapers and the ruling junta (whether military or political) will reap the benefits be they financial orpower ( )
  busterrll | Aug 5, 2016 |
This part is divided into three sections. The first section deals with the immediate aftermath of the cyclone that hit Burma in 2008 and how it was dealt with by governments and aid groups. The second section is more of an historical look back on how government works in Burma and the events leading up to the cyclone and the third section is the stories that the author personally collected in the aftermath of the cyclone. Before I finished the first section, I almost gave up on this book. For the subject matter, I found it dry, a little disjointed and very business like. I was glad I didn't--the next sections, particularly the third section, really pulled me into the book and held me rapt. ( )
  mamashepp | Mar 29, 2016 |
This part is divided into three sections. The first section deals with the immediate aftermath of the cyclone that hit Burma in 2008 and how it was dealt with by governments and aid groups. The second section is more of an historical look back on how government works in Burma and the events leading up to the cyclone and the third section is the stories that the author personally collected in the aftermath of the cyclone. Before I finished the first section, I almost gave up on this book. For the subject matter, I found it dry, a little disjointed and very business like. I was glad I didn't--the next sections, particularly the third section, really pulled me into the book and held me rapt. ( )
  mamashepp | Mar 29, 2016 |
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For friends in Burma, and for Justin
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A deeply reported account of life inside Burma in the months following the disastrous Cyclone Nargis and an analysis of the brutal totalitarian regime that clings to power in the devastated nation.

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