HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

France in the Middle Ages 987-1460: From…
Loading...

France in the Middle Ages 987-1460: From Hugh Capet to Joan of Arc… (1987)

by Georges Duby

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1012180,095 (3.57)1

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 2 of 2
CHRONOLOGY; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; PHOTOGRAPHY; MAPS; GENEALOGY TABLES
  saintmarysaccden | Apr 24, 2013 |
I was extremely disappointed with this book - so disappointed that I quit reading about a third of the way through. Duby's goal is NOT to tell us what happened, but contemporary perceptions of what happened. In his introduction he writes "My aim has been to present the medieval world through the eyes of contemporaries and, as far as possible, to experience their own perception of their place within it." p. ix

Later (and this is the point where I stopped reading), He discusses how what happened appears different from what the chroniclers believe happened and (I'm paraphrasing) he explains that since his goal was not to present what actually did happen but rather how contemporaries felt about what was happening, he would concentrate on the latter. I looked for the specific phrase to quote but didn't find it. I think that's OK though because the book is virtually not footnoted (I found 2) and has a sparse bibliography so a failure to reference specifics shouldn't bother Duby.

I wouldn't have a problem with a book that discusses how contemporaries felt about what was happening around them (there is certainly a place for these types of works and I have several) if there was any indication in any editorial summary, amazon.com product description, or even what's on the back cover of the book that this was the topic - there isn't. I've since been told this is standard for Duby (his Wikipedia entry even discusses it) and I should have known better. Unfortunately, this was one of the very early books I bought on history (the lack of footnotes alone would keep me from it today).

Anyway, this is mostly a word of caution to anyone thinking about buying this book. It's not what it's advertised as - not completely anyway. I'd donate it to my local library except I like my library. ( )
1 vote cemanuel | Dec 25, 2008 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0631189459, Paperback)

In this book, now available in paperback, he examines the history of France from the rise of the Capetians in the mid-tenth century to the execution of Joan of Arc in the mid-fifteenth. He takes the evolution of power and the emergence of the French state as his central themes, and guides the reader through complex - and, in many respects, still unfamiliar, yet fascinating terrain. He describes the growth of the castle and the village, the building blocks of the new Western European civilization of the second millenium AD.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:27 -0400)

Duby examines the history of France from the rise of the Capetians in the mid-tenth century to the execution of Joan of Arc in the mid-fifteenth. He takes the evolution of power and the emergence of the French state as his central themes, and guides the reader through complex - and, in many respects, still unfamiliar, yet fascinating terrain. He describes the growth of the castle and the village, the building blocks of the new Western European civilization of the second millennium AD.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.57)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5 1
3 2
3.5 1
4 6
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 136,343,145 books! | Top bar: Always visible